How to deal with dissatisfied customers: learn from Troo Health Care

I am sitting here looking at a business card that came with a delivery from Troo Health Care and the following words leap out to me as they take up most of the space on the card:

“If there is ANYTHING you are not satisfied with regarding your order please TELL US before you tell anyone else.”

That tells you all that you need to know about the new world – if you are listening:

  • Every single customer, every single interaction, matters because for the first time in history every single ordinary customer can amplify her voice through social media and impact the company either positively or negatively;
  • Customer dissatisfaction matters because it is the one thing that will drive customers to write about you on the internet and share it with just about anyone that is listening;
  • The best way to deal with dissatisfied customers is to get them to contact you so that you can turn the dissatisfaction into satisfaction before they tell everyone else – so open up the channels and invite contacts from your customers;
  • In the long run it is cheaper and safer to turn a dissatisfied customer into a satisfied customer because she is likely to share how well you treated her – especially when she was not expecting that from you;
  • The marketing being done by your customers (through social media) is now as powerful as your corporate marketing; and
  • Customer experience is the new marketing battleground.

Why marketing is one of the main drivers of customer dissatisfaction

I find it interesting that on the one hand the CMO is often given the leadership role in improving the customer experience and on the other hand the marketing function is one of the  prime culprits in generating customer dissatisfaction, calls into the call centre and customer churn.

How exactly does the marketing function contribute to customer unhappiness, negative word of mouth and customer churn?  By misleading the customer – sometimes unintentionally but often intentionally.  Lets make this real by sharing some examples:

Recently Vauxhall (GM brand in the UK) has had to change its Lifetime Warranty advert after customer complaints.  Why did some people complain and get the ad changed?  If you read the small print you find that the Lifetime Warranty is not a lifetime warranty in the sense that the normal person understands it.  Specifically, the warranty covers only the first 100,000.  And it applies only to the first owner – the warranty is not transferable to later owners.

How many people will buy a Vauxhall car without reading the small print and then be disappointed?  How many of these customers will then ring the contact centre to complain?  How many will go on to tweet about their negative experience?

My wife shops with La Redoubte regularly so she was pleased when she got a promotional offer through the post.  She proceeded to spend a considerable amount of time and psychic energy in choosing the two garments she wanted.  Then she range the contact centre to place her order.  Only after she had placed her order did she find that she could not get the promotional discount: apparently the promotion did not apply.  Yet the agent could not explain why not – at least not to my wife’s satisfaction.

Result: my wife is no longer an advocate and a loyal shopper that La Redoubte can take for granted.  I will be writing a post about this soon to draw out some insights.

In the UK, the mobile operators are advertising very favourable offers.  When you look at the offers you find that at a price point in the 18 month contract, the customer has to reclaim a certain discount (that is used to advertise low monthly charges) and has to use specific procedure and complete this procedure in a specific time.

The marketing thinking behind this is clear:  you can get customers because the pricing looks attractive and yet the customer’s end up paying more because the redemption process has been designed to make sure that only the most diligent customers will successfully redeem the discount.   How many of these customers will ring the contact centre to complain?  How many are being taught to distrust marketing communications?

Then you have my BSkyB experience that I wrote about back in September 2010.  Where I shared my story of how I was lured in by the slick marketing promising a bundled offer and an easy life only to find a very different reality:  How to turn an advocate into a detractor?

Are these the only companies that are engaged in these practices?  No.  I am not pointing my finger at these ‘bad’ companies – they are no better and no worse than the majority of companies.  Why is that?  Because the practice of misleading customers either through sloppy communication or deliberate manipulation is widespread.  It is even considered good marketing!