What Does It Take To Delight This Customer?

Story: The Customer Experiences Sadness & Delight

Last week, Friday, it’s 10:00 and I am working from home.  Andy’s not arrived yet.  I’m wondering if he is OK or if he has forgotten. Neither of these thoughts occurs as a pleasant experience. Then I hear myself speaking: “It’s Andy, most likely he’s simply running late – its who he is. Relax. He’ll probably be here in the next 30 minutes.” I relax, and get back to work.

The doorbell rings. I open the door and see Andy standing there with his smile. I notice that I am happy to see him. I tell him that I am pleased/happy to see him. And invite him into my home whilst asking if he wants a drink. Andy says “A tea would be nice!” I ask him how he likes it and get busy making that tea.  The tea is brewing as Andy likes his tea strong; both of us are standing up in the kitchen.

Andy says “Sorry about contacting you amidst your cancer. What’s the news?”  I thank him for the discreet ways (email, SMS) that he kept in touch and reminded me that the vents had arrived and he was ready to install them when it worked for me.  I tell him that sorting out the condensation problem in the loft (the job to be done from my perspective) continues to be something matters and I am happy that he is here to do that for me. Then I answer his question around my cancer.

After listening patiently Andy shares his (relevant) experiences. His health, the blood tests he has to undergo, the medicines he has to take, and the way this has impacted his existence.  He also talks about his late mother and her cancer journey. We talk a while. Then I excuse myself as nature calls.  Andy gets busy with that which needs doing in the loft.

A little while later Andy comes down and finds me working on my laptop. And says something like “Sorry for disturbing you and I’ve finished”.  We get talking again. In the process he tells me that he noticed that the insulation in the loft is minimal. He tells me that his house had been in a similar situation and that he had managed to get a grant for extra insulation. He gives me the name of a website.  I thank him.

We move into the kitchen and he sets about writing me an invoice. I notice that the labour charge is a fraction of that which Andy had quoted. I point this out.

Andrew Laney Carpentry

Andy says in a matter of fact “It was a lot easier than I thought. It only took half an hour. So that’s the labour charge.”

I say let me pay you now and set about logging into my mobile banking app. Turns out that I no longer have Andrew Laney Carpentry and Maintenance set up. So I ask for Andy’s bank details. He gives me his bank card and make the attempt to pay him. Problem: there is fault in the mobile banking app that does not allow me enter his full name (somebody has not done good enough UX testing on the banking app).

I say, “Let me take a photo of your bank card. That way I’ll have your details and can punch them into the website using the laptop.  I will text you once I make the payment. Please text me back to confirm that you have received the payment.”

The outside door is open and Andy is in the midst of stepping out.  I say “Thank you Andy. Give my regards to John when you next see him. And remember that I work from home on Fridays. If you’re in the area then come around for a tea. You’re welcome.”  Andy tells me that is in the area from time to time, on a Friday, and will take me up on my offer.  I shake his hand and we part company.

I get present to my state of being  – noticing that I find myself experiencing both sadness and delight.

Who/What Is The Cause of Customer Sadness & Delight?

I look into my sadness and delight.  What is going on here?  Why the sadness?  What is the cause of delight?

Sadness. I notice it is the kind of sadness I experience when parting company with a friend. Interesting, at some deeper level than my conscious/rational mind, Andy is showing up for me as a friend.  Makes sense, he is friendly and we do have history together in the sense that some months back he did some work on my home. He was recommended by the fitter that i was using for a major refurbishment – I wrote a conversation on that here.

The delight. Why am I delighted? What is the source of the delight?  I notice that there are several dimensions:

  1. The job to be done (fix condensation problem in loft) occurs as done and is no longer on my mind – I had been carrying this problem for over a year;
  2. I enjoyed my interactions/conversations with Andy – genuine human to human relating had occurred where I found myself with a richer picture of Andy including knowing stuff that I would never have guessed unless he had shared it with me e.g. his military service, his mother’s cancer etc;
  3. The whole thing had turned out to be less troublesome and less costly than I had thought it would be; and
  4. Andy had done right by me all along validating my decision to put my problem (job to be done) in Andy’s hands and trust him.

Which might explain why it is that immediately after Andy left I logged into my Mac, paid him electronically, and texted him to tell him that I had done so, and asked him to confirm that he had got the payment. Doing otherwise, did not occur as an option – not even delaying it to the afternoon.

How Has Andy Laney Done Right By Me?

Looking into my experience of delight, it struck me that the defining factor in my experiencing delight is the thought-feeling “Andy’s done right by me; I made the right decision to trust this man!”  So I got busy looking into that – to see finer detail of doing right by me is made up of in this instance.  Here’s what shows up for me:

  1. I shared the problem with Andy and I proposed the solution – that of replacing some of the roof tiles with vented roof tiles;
  2. Andy looked into the matter and came up with a much cheaper/easier solution that of using internal vented tiles;
  3. My focus/priority to switched from this job to be done to dealing with cancer – and in the process I neglected this job to be done;
  4. Andy had kept in touch discreetly and minimally via non-intrusive means – mostly email about the job e.g. “The vents have arrived,” and SMS to ask about my cancer;
  5. Andy had seen the job through and been honest/straight all the way to the end – he could easily have played around for 2 to 3 hours, made the job look more complex, and charged me that which he quoted or more as I would have paid; and
  6. Andy had also been on my side (helpful) to the end – by pointing out that I do need to improve the insulation in the loft (work that he does not do) and telling me where I could get a government funded grant to cover all/most of the cost.

What Was The Real Gift That Andy Laney Left Me With?

Looking deeper still it hits me that Andy Laney gave me a gift. What gift? A gift that really matters to me!  What gift?  Evidence/experience of folks (in the world of business) who are decent/good.  Folks for whom money is not the measure of all things. Folks who embody a certain kind of old fashioned human dignity. And show up/operate with a sense of dignity/honour.  Folks for whom cheating customers does not occur as an option – even to consider this seriously would be to sully one’s self-esteem.  Thank you Andy for this gift.

I thank you for the listening. I wish you the very best.  Until the next time…

Maz Signature

CX: Using Intelligent Generosity To Cultivate Customer Delight

Certain businesses deal with products that perish or become useless if not used by a certain date/time.  This is often seen as a problem – a problem of generating demand to drive sales, and a problem of inventory management. I have yet to see this viewed, by Tops, as an opportunity to delight customers, and cultivate gratitude / loyalty between the customer and the business.

What am I talking about? Allow me to illustrate using a recent experience.

Recently, I booked a double room at the local Hilton (St. Annes Manor) hotel via Hotels.com.  I made a mistake – I booked it in my name, and for only one adult. So when time came for my wife and daughter to go to the hotel I rang the hotel. The voice on the other hand was professional and warm. The young lady didn’t just change the booking. Once she learnt that the room was for two adults, she took charge, and without me asking, found a room with two beds. I found myself pleased and grateful.  Later that evening my wife sent me a photo of the room – it was a room with two double beds.  Delight – my wife was delighted, my daughter was delighted, and I was delighted.  Along with this kind of room came four towels – ideal for those of us who needed access to that room merely to shower – until the major renovation work is finished in our home.

Think about it. What did the hotel lose by giving us that bigger (deluxe) room?  Nothing!  It was late in the day, the room was free, and if it had not been used it would have created no value for anyone.  Through intelligent generosity the lady on the front desk did create value: for us (the customers) and also for that hotel. How so for the hotel? I am writing about the hotel right now am I not?  Also, it was the first time any member of the family stayed there – those that got to experience it (wife and daughter) love it and have been talking about it – recommending it to others: the room, the peaceful / beautiful location, the spa…..  I also suspect that sooner or later my wife will check us in there for a quiet weekend away from the children.

It occurs to me that every business that deals with ‘perishable’ inventory has an opportunity to exercise intelligent generosity:

If you are an airline then you can offer seats (that your analytical models show will go unfilled) to some of your customers for free – as a thank you;

If you are a hotel you can do as our local Hilton did and/or offer some / all of the rooms likely to go unfilled to some of your customers for free – as a thank you or as taster;

If you are a supermarket, you have an opportunity to give food that is reaching its sell by date to certain customers (you choose which ones) or to local community organisation / charity that supports those in need…..

I know that some organisations do something this  e.g. airlines which offer free upgrades to certain customers.  I know that some hotels do this also. What I am talking about here is this and more than this – in some instances giving perishable product away to customers for free – free flight, free hotel stay, free train ticket, free concert ticket……

The question I am posing is this one: what opportunities does your business have to exercise intelligent generosity – the kind of generosity that causes customer surprise / delight / gratitude, holds the promise of increased revenue and/or brand reputation over the longer term, yet costs you little or nothing today?

Before you dismiss the question that I have posed, I ask you to consider that if ‘perishable’ inventory is not used by its sell-by date then it is waste. Is waste a better outcome / way of showing up and traveling in life than intelligent generosity?  All I can say is that the field of intelligent generosity appears large and largely unoccupied.

I thank you for your listening, until the next time…

The Effortless Experience: Sensational Headlines, Misleading Conclusion?

In this post I complete my take on the key assertion and the 4 findings put forth in the book The Effortless Experience.  Before I launch into this post let’s recap the following points from the first post.

Recap of the essential points from the earlier post

The four major findings put forth by the authors:

  1. A strategy of delight doesn’t pay
  2. Satisfaction is not a predictor of loyalty
  3. Customer service interaction tend to drive disloyalty, not loyalty
  4. The key to mitigating disloyalty is reducing customer effort

Let’s also get clear on the scope of the research that gave rise to these findings. The primary mechanism was post (contact centre) call surveys completed by customers. And the scope did not included the end 2 end customer experience:

An important disclosure before we reveal the results and their implications: we intentionally limited this study to service transactions and their impact on customer loyalty.

And my position?  I shared in the first post that these findings show up for me as a statement of the bleeding obvious. And it occurs to me that the headline grabbing finding “Satisfaction is not a predictor of loyalty” is misleading if not flawed.  Now I fulfil on my promise to share my rationale.

Dealing with findings 2, 3, and 4

How many studies do we need to get that satisfaction is not a predictor of loyalty?  Just look into your experience!  I can be satisfied, even delighted, with a physiotherapist and switch to a chiropractor. Why? Because by switching I reduce my travel time from 45-60 minutes (each way) to  15-20 minutes each way.  I can be satisfied with a particular restaurant and try out new restaurants that show up on my radar – usually as result of some recommendation.  I can be satisfied with a particular mobile telco and switch because of some promotion heavily promoted by a competitor …

Who does the customer turn to when s/he has a pressing issue which needs to be dealt with?  Customer Services and the folks sitting in some distant contact centre.  What does it take for a customer to make the call to these contact-centres?  My experience that many of us only call the contact centre if and only if we cannot address the issue through other means: internet, self-service channels, friends….. Why? Because, on the whole the experience of dealing with contact centres is effortful and painful.

It occurs to me that customers increasingly turn to Customer Services as a last resort and usually with the more complex issues/problems.  And on the whole the Customer Services function is not designed to help customers with these complex issues/problems;  contact-centres are staffed and run to minimise the cost of operations not to deliver a good customer experience.  As a result of the mismatch between the needs of the Customer and the design-operation of the contact-centre customers often have to force a solution out from the contact-centre.  That is to say that at best the interaction shows up as effortful. And there are many instances where the contact centre is unhelpful: quoting policy or making promises and not delivering on them as Customer Services has little power in the rest of the organisation.  Given this is it any surprising that “Customer service interaction tend to drive disloyalty, not loyalty” and “The key to mitigating disloyalty is reducing customer effort”.  Don’t take my word for it, read this post for my British Gas experience.

Dealing with the profound finding: “A strategy of delight doesn’t pay”

Take a look at delight.  What shows up?  For me, taken a phenomenological approach, the following shows up:

  1. I rarely find myself delighted in the course of interacting with companies of which I am a customer.

  2. When I do find myself delighted it is because someone who is a representative of the company , or the company itself, has ‘given’ me something that shows up for me as valuable and which I did not expect.

  3. Delight is contextual – the  content which shows up as delightful in one context does not necessarily show up as delightful in another context. For example, being upgraded from an economy seat to a business seat, in Virgin Atlantic, for a transatlantic flight showed up a delightful.  If I had been upgraded in the case of an hour flight the hassle would have probably outweighed the ‘delight’. Friendly-chatty service show up as delightful when I am relaxed and have plenty of time to spare; the same friendly-chatty service shows up as annoying-intruding-unprofessional when I am in a hurry and simply want the job done, the outcome delivered. If getting the job done turned out to be easier than I imagined, involved less effort on my part, then I tend to be delighted at how easy-effortless the experience was – whether conducting research, making a purchase, or contacting the customer services team and getting help with an issue.

  4. In service transactions there is something like a recipe for generating delight in customers. The recipe involves: solving the customer’s problem; doing so quickly not leaving the customer hanging and most likely worried; minimising the effort that the customer has to make; and last but not least the human element – how you treat the customer as a flesh and blood human being with or without respect, with warmth or with coldness/indifference, as a unique fellow human being or just another call to be handled asap to meet the call time metrics….

How do the authors of the Effortless Experience see, define and measure delight? They see it very differently to me.  They do not see delight in phenomenological terms: that which shows up in the customer’s lived experience – body and mind.  No, they have defined a strategy of delight as consisting of a number of tactics falling under the category Moments of “Wow”:

“Moments of “Wow”

– Willingness of service to go above and beyond

– Applying knowledge about customers

– Exceeding customer expectations

– Teaching the customer

– Offering alternatives

– Perceived value of alternatives”

So what the author’s research is testing, if it is testing anything, is the effectiveness of these tactics in generating delight and thus loyalty.  What if these tactics annoy customers rather than delight customers?  Just this week, I rang my broadband supplier as my patience had run out. The contact-centre agent was helpful. In between conducting the tests, and understanding the size of my home, she was telling me about a special offer (wireless range extender) that the company had on, encouraging me to take advantage of this offer, and telling me she would be happy to guide me through the online process.  Did this land as delightful for me? No! Why not? Because I just wanted her to fix my broadband so I could get my work done!  I didn’t ring to get advice. I didn’t ring to get a free wireless range extender. I range because the broadband was slow, had been slow intermittently over weeks, and that day I desperately needed the broadband to work because I had pressing work to get done and for that I needed a fast (enough) internet connection!

Now take a look at what the authors have placed under the category of Customer Effort:

“Customer Effort

– Number of transfers

– Repeating information

– First contact resolution

– Number of contacts to resolve

– Perceived additional effort to resolve

– Ease of contacting service

– Channel switching

– Time to resolve”

It occurs to me that many of the factors that are likely to lead to delight showing up in customers, as a lived bodily experience, in-around-after a customer service interaction have been placed in the Customer Effort category.

If I am correct, this exhaustive research, the millions of data points, and the subsequent profound finding “Strategy of delight doesn’t pay” is:

  • misleading at best;
  • has been misinterpreted and misreported by many in the media (including bloggers) who failed to dive into the fundamental grounds of this research;
  • does not prove that leaving customers feeling delighted does not generate an economic return.

I get that I make mistakes. If you see mistakes in the analysis that I have shared with you then please point them out to me by commenting.

Shareholder value or customer delight? Choose

It doesn’t work if you fill up the tank with petrol when your car runs on diesel.  It doesn’t work to turn up at a nightclub and expect to get peace-quiet.  It doesn’t work to drive down the wrong side of the road at a busy time when there are lots of cars on the road and expect no problems.  It doesn’t work to turn up in your bikini for work or to turn up with your business suit to sunbathe on the beach.  And almost all of us get that.

So why is it that in the world of business we forget this.  Why is it that we still cling to stupid ideas, and practices, like what gets measured gets done. Rubbish. In the world of business what gets measured gets gamed. And if it isn’t being gamed now, then you can rest assured that someone is working on finding a way to game it especially if his/her bonus cheque depends on that measure.

Take the idea of best practice. When all the players in the industry go for best practice, the best practice is to do something totally different. Isn’t that what Jobs did?  And in the process he reinvented and created industries. So worshipping at the altar of best practice and benchmarking is a stupid practice especially if you are on of the followers, the laggards.

Then there is the stupid idea that you can generate genuine collaboration and teamwork within the organisation – social business – when the context the players operate from is one of competition: for resources, for recognition, for rewards.  In a context of competition what shows up is competition.  If you are stupid enough not to accept this and demand collaboration then you will get competition disguised as collaboration.

Which is the most stupid idea of all within the realm of business?  It is the one that was invented some 30 – 40 years ago.  It is the idea of shareholder value as being the sole purpose of a business and its management team. Why is it stupid?  Allow me to quote Roger Martin, Dean, Rotman School of Management:

Customer delight is a more powerful objective than shareholder value ….. if you take care of customers, shareholders will be drawn along for a very nice ride. The opposite is simply not true: if you try to take care of shareholders, customer’s don’t benefit, and ironically, shareholders don’t get very far either.

A lot of the issues that I see in the customer thing is that many of us are attempting to force it into the shareholder value game.  And it doesn’t fit.  The shareholder value game is the ‘one night stand’ game – get me laid this year!  Whereas the customer delight game is a longer-term game, an affair that keeps both parties interested in each other over the longer term.

giffgaff: how to generate delight and advocacy without spending a fortune

Occasionally I come across a brand, an organisation, a bunch of people who get it, who practice it as opposed to talk about it.  Who am I talking about?  I am talking about giffgaff – a mobile virtual network operator that works off / is tied to the O2 network in the UK.  giffgaff is unusual/innovative as a brand/organisation and I have written about giffgaff here and here. You should know that my family and I are members/customers of giffgaff.

Delight is the gateway to the heart

There is a school of thought that says that delighting customers is expensive and unnecessary.  I say that if you want to cultivate emotional affinity with your brand, create fans and generate customer advocacy then delight is the gateway that gets you there.   I say that you can generate delight by:

  • being there for your customers;
  • making it easy for the customer to get done the job that the customer needs done; and
  • injecting humanity (high touch) into the encounter between you and your customer.

Furthermore, I say that it is not expensive to evoke delight in your customers. Allow me to share with you how giffgaff has generated delight and cultivated gratitude/loyalty with me and my daughter.

How my daughter and I came to love giffgaff

Talking with my 11 year old daughter I found that her phone was useless as a phone as she had lost the SIM.  It turned out that the SIM had gone missing several weeks ago.  She hadn’t told me because she was thinking that it will cost money to get a replacement SIM and she didn’t have the money; she is great at spending, not so great at saving.

Within a minute or so we had logged on her account.  Straight away we found the link for ‘Lost SIM’ and then from there it took us less than 30 seconds to block the SIM and order a replacement.  My daughter and I were both happy at how it easy it was.  The job that we needed to get done (block the old SIM, order a replacement SIM) was done with several clicks and in less than two minutes.  Easy, easy, easy!  Thank you giffgaff for being there for us and making it easy to get the job that needed to be done, done.

What else did we notice?  We noticed that we were both grateful to giffgaff.  Why?  Because we were expecting giffgaff to charge us for this service yet giffgaff did not charge us.  So giffgaff showed up as generous: a friend helping us out in time of need as opposed to a business intent solely on making money from its customers.

When you have lost your SIM and order a replacement what is your ideal outcome?  That the SIM will arrive quickly, ideally the next day.  Yet, what is likely to be your experience?  My experiences with other companies had led me to believe that the SIM would take 3 -5 days to arrive.  What happened?  A colorful envelope (see below) arrived the next day.  What was our experience?  Surprise and delight.  I remember saying to myself “Wow, these guys care, they have their house in order!”

Notice the language that is being used?  How does it show up in your world?  In our world it showed up as quirky/friendly/even fun.  More importantly, it showed up as the kind of tone/language that a friend, a warm human being, would use as opposed to a corporation.

With my daughter standing by my side I opened up the envelope and this what greeted us:

What was our experience?  Surprise and delight.  What generated this surprise and delight?  The ‘tone’ that is conveyed by the language that is used.  This ‘piece of communication’ showed up as being written by a caring human being, a friend!  This is personalisation that actually shows up as personal and pulls the heart strings.  It occurs as genuine, heartfelt, authentic.  There is so much talk about ‘social’ and so little understanding of ‘social’.  I say this piece of communication is ‘social’.  I say if you really want to get social then study this communication.

What you can learn from this?

1) Ease matters, it makes a difference.  Lack of ease drives up customer frustration, generates customer complaints, drives up costs as customers use the call centre as opposed to using the website.  And lack of ease drives up defection: customers go to suppliers who are easier to do business with.  There are companies that have become giants simply because they have got ease right: Amazon is the giant that it is because the folks at Amazon have made it so easy to buy all kinds of products from Amazon.

2) Speed of response matters.  The faster that you are at responding to customer requests the more of an impact you make.  Customers are human beings, human beings impute – they read stuff into stuff.  When you respond fast customers impute that you care, that you are competent, that the customer is in safe hands.  When you slow in responding customers assume that you do not care about them and that you are incompetent, understaffed, unprofessional….

3) Generosity matters, it is noticed, it touches the heart.   Generosity does not have a big presence in the business world.  As customers we expect to be made to pay for just about everything.  We particularly expect to be squeezed for every penny, every dime, when we have an urgent need and we are at fault.   In such a world generosity gets noticed.   And for many of us generosity generates gratitude.  Most of us are brought up to practice the rule of reciprocity: one good turn deserves another.

4) You can generate delight and affinity simply by using the right language with the customer.  What does it require?  Humanity: getting and treating human beings with dignity, with compassion.  And it is cheap!  How much money would giffgaff have saved by making their envelope bland (not colorful) or using cold, unfriendly, corporate speak?  Sometimes I think that for all the talk about customers and customer focus, what is really missing is ‘love for the customer’ as a fellow human being.  Put differently, what is missing is putting our humanity, the best of our humanity, into the game of business.

What do you say?