What does it take to be a customer-centric enterprise?

What is it to be a customer-centric enterprise?

When I started my journey in the land of customer-centricity (2000), the answer to this question, according to the leading theorists and proponents, was this: an enterprise that organises itself by customer segments rather than products; and where one starts with the needs/wants of the customer segment/s and works back to the ‘products’ that meet these needs/wants.

There is another answer and it usually comes from those working in, or selling to those working in, the Customer Services arena. As far as I can see, an enterprise is customer-centric if it provides good/great customer service.

Today, I provide you with my point of view and it is informed by my recent experience with Bergli Books . First let me tell you my story.

I Order a Book From Bergli, I Never Get My Hands On It

I saw an add on Facebook for a book on Switzerland. I ordered that book by clicking on that ad and paid by credit card. Then I waited for the book to arrive. It didn’t. And, after some four weeks I contacted Bergli via email. The folks at Bergli looked into the matter and told me that the book had been delivered weeks ago. And, asked me to talk with my neighbours – to see if one of them has taken delivery. I responded that I have 15 neighbours and I was not going to chase all of them up on the basis anybody who has the book and didn’t hand it over to me is not likely to own up to have ‘stolen’ a book meant for me.

The folks at Bergli were great as in they agreed to send me another copy. And, the told me when it was going to be delivered. When I did not receive the book I emailed the folks at Bergli. Once again, they were polite and responsive. They looked into the matter and told me that their distributor had delivered the book. And, provided proof. Given that I had not received the book, they told me to ask my neighbours.

What is being communicated here by Bergli? Is it not something like, “Hey, you ordered a book, we sent it out, our logistics partner states that the book has been delivered. So over to you – it’s not our problem but yours if it was delivered or taken by one of your neighbours. And, don’t bother us as we have done our job!”

My definition of a customer-centric enterprise

I say: “A customer-centric enterprise takes the customer’s problem, makes it it’s own, and solves it in a way that leaves the customer happy and grateful.”

Allow me to illustrate, there is huge chasm between my experiences with Amazon (in the UK) and Bergli. If I had been dealing with the folks at Amazon they would solved my problem as in made sure that I got my hands on the product that I had ordered. If a second delivery had failed to make its way into my hands, the Amazon folks would have gone all out to make sure that the third delivery did end up in my hands.

What does it take to be a customer-centric enterprise?

What would have happened if Bergli had sent me an alert (email, sms) to let me know that the book had been despatched? Another one to tell me when the book was being delivered? And, one when the book was delivered? As I have been working from home for months, I would have gone downstairs to my postbox and retrieved the book.

Alternatively, what if Bergli books had allowed me to choose the day/date that I wanted the book to be delivered? There are online operations in Switzerland that do just that: I place the order on the website, and in the process of checking out I choose which day I want the item to be delivered. And, I always choose the day when I know I will be at home. This way, I have never missed a delivery.

Why did Bergli not allow me to choose the delivery date and/or provide the alerts? I suspect that Bergli has not put in place the requisites: the technology infrastructure; and choosing a delivery partner that has the requisite technology infrastructure. One that holds my customer details. One that tracks the progress/status of the delivery. One that sends out timely alerts as the delivery makes it way to the customer.

Which brings me to this conclusion: if your enterprise wishes to show up as customer-centric (as perceived by your customers) then it is essential that effective use is made of digital technologies.

Please note that effective use of digital technologies is necessary but not sufficient.

Beware The ‘Customer-Centric’ Enterprise!

It’s evening time, work is finished for the day, and I am taking a stroll.

Across my path I notice a man in his thirties. He smiles.  He starts speaking to me. I reply. He notices that I am a foreigner in this land. He says “English?”, I say “Yes”. He asks where I am from. I tell him. Then he says he likes English football.

I am listening – listening with a view to understand what he is talking about. Then he moves closer into me and starts ‘tackling’ me – the “English tackle” he says. He says something about the World Cup…. I stand there puzzled – why is this fellow up close and personal with me? I didn’t give him my permission.

Right at that moment this feeling hits me: “Somethings not right!”. Automatically, I reach for my back pocket where I keep my wallet.  What do I find?  I find his hand there on my back pocket: he is in the midst of stealing my wallet.

I find myself hit with a wave of disgust. Why? It hits me that it has all been a charade – an effort to distract and deceive me long enough for him to pick my pocket and walk away with my wallet.

A little later it occurs to me that this is true for the whole customer-centric thing.  What do I mean by that?  I mean that when you strip away the fine sounding words, the whole Customer thing – as lived by just about every large business I have come in contact with – comes down to this:

  • Working out which customers have the biggest wallets;
  • Striving to understand the motivations, inclinations, behaviours and weaknesses of customers; and
  • Using this insight to craft-execute ‘strategies’ to attract/engage/seduce the customer long enough to walk away with his wallet without alerting the customer to what is really going on.

So, my advice to you as a customer is be wary of the customer-centric enterprise. Why?  The odds are it is a pickpocket in disguise.  Instead go for the enterprise that has a reputation for great products (e.g. Apple). Or a reputation for great service (e.g. Amazon). Ideally, one that has a reputation for a great products and great service (e.g. John Lewis).

 

 

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