An opportunity for Amazon to improve and get more customers?

Amazon is a great company

We all know or should know that when it comes to customer-centricity (as embodied by the products, the shopping experience, the useful recommendations, the helpful customer service…) Amazon is one of the greats.  And whilst Jeff Bezos is in charge I’d place my bets in favour of Amazon v Apple when it comes to continuing to be customer-centric given that Steve Jobs is no longer around.  So where is the opportunity to improve?  The Kindle.

The Kindle is a great product – we, the customers love it

When I read the reviews on Amazon for the Kindle, on Amazon.co.uk or Amazon.com,  I find that the majority of customers are delighted with their Kindle.  So what is it that I have to offer Amazon?  What is the opportunity that Amazon has to improve and get more customers?  Let me share a story with you.

This morning I was out shopping (looking for a new television – the wife and children want a new one!) and popped into one of the big chain retailers in the UK.  As I was making my way to the TVs I noticed an elderly gent (with an ear piece) looking at the 6″ Kindle retailing for £89.  Given that the stand from which I operate is that of being of service and contributing to a ‘world that works’ I stopped to be of service.  I shared with him that I had purchased that Kindle and was delighted with it.  He mentioned that he had the bigger Kindle that retails for £139 and was delighted with that.  I went on to share that I’d been surprised at how much I loved the Kindle given that I love the touch, feel and usability of the book in its physical form.   That is when the conversation became really interesting.

This old gentleman told me that he, his wife and friends read a lot of books.  They grew up with books and they are a great way to pass the time.  He and many of his friends had switched to the Kindle because as they are old it is easier to buy and read books via the Kindle.  How exactly?  His response: we don’t have to make our way to bookstores (not an easy thing to do when you are old), we don’t have to carry books home and we do not have to struggle to read the books.  My question: what is the difference with the Kindle that makes the book more readable for you?  His answer:  with the Kindle I can increase the font size so that I can easily read the book!

So where is the opening for Amazon to improve and get more customers?

Being inquisitive I asked this old gent if he was entirely satisfied with the Kindle?  No, was his answer.  I asked if all of his friends were using the Kindle?  No, was his answer.  My next question: why not?  Can you guess his response?  Put yourself in his shoes – what is it like to be old?  You are physically challenged: the eyes don’t work well, the ears don’t work that well, the hands don’t work that well….

Amazon you can design a Kindle specifically for older people.  They love the purchasing process and the ability to increase the font size is such a boon it helps make reading both possible and enjoyable.  Yet, the controls are not easy for the old folks to work – the old folks simply do not have the dexterity to use small, difficult to use, controls.  And you can make the screen bigger.  Why?  Because the old folks use big font sizes and with that get only so much text on the screen which in turn means that they have to use the controls more often to flick from one screen (‘page’) to the next.  This becomes tiring if your hands/fingers don’t work as well as they used to.

It is worth investigating given that there are more and more older people living longer and longer.  Intuition suggests that there is a sizeable customer segment here that is worth catering for especially as it is the older folks that have grown up within a culture of reading books.

Finally: how do you get access to what you don’t know that you don’t know about your customers?

By stepping out of the office and into the real world: deliberately being where you customers are, watching what they do, acting out of stance of being of service and learning from/about your customers, striking up conversations with customers…… Until this encounter with this old gent I had assumed that only the young and technically literate were buying and using the Kindle.  I had discounted the older folks.  And I had no idea that the key benefits of the Kindle for older folks were the shopping experience (instant) and the ability to increase the font size!  I didn’t know that I didn’t know because I am not old and these things have never entered into my conscious mind.

How USEFUL are you to your customers?

Take a look at your business through SD Logic

If you use the Service Dominant Logic lens (as opposed to a good dominant logic) it opens up a new way of looking at the interaction/interface between your business and the Customer.  The key aspects of the Services Dominant Logic (for me) are:

  • the Customer approaches your business because he/she has a job (something to do) and an outcome (the desired end state) in mind;
  • the products and/or solutions you sell are better thought of as services your provide to help the Customer get the job done and achieve her desired end state.

SDLogic gives rise to the question: how useful am I to the Customer?

If you look more deeply into this you are likely to see that a key question arises: how USEFUL are you and your products/services/solutions to the customer in terms of the job he has in mind and the outcome/s she wants?   It seems to me that many are attracted to all manner of toys’ and yet few are focussed in excelling at being USEFUL to the customer across the customer journey.  I would go further and say that what I find most stunning given the whole thing around customer-centricity, customer focus, customer obsession is the lack of conversation around the following questions:

  1. What phenomena (devices, environment, cues, messages, touchpoints…) would have to be present for us to show up as USEFUL in the Customer’s world?
  2. How useful are we?  Where do we excel?  Where do we fall short?  (As viewed through the Customer’s eyes)
  3. What is present that needs to be taken out to be useful?
  4. What is missing the presence of which would make us useful – as viewed through Customer eyes?

Why USEFULNESS matters

It is 3am in the morning as I get up and get ready to drive my eldest to Gatwick Airport so that he can catch is 7am flight to France.  By 3:45 I have walked up to the top of the hill where I parked the car last night and have filled the boot with shovels, supplies (food, drinks, blankets, torch…) and luggage.  I have also dislodged all the snow sitting on all the windows – overnight we got some 15cm of snow as predicted.  At 3:50 we set-off.  This is journey that should only take about 50 minutes and I know that it is going to take at least twice that long: the snow covers the roads and pavements like a thick blanket and so I am driving around  15 mph.  Finally, we make it to the motorway and we are travelling between 40 mph and 60 mph.   Not great but it is ok as I had allowed for this: when you have done enough big projects and programmes then identifying risks and coming up with contingency plans becomes second nature.

It is now 4:45 and we are only half an hour away from Gatwick Airport.  There is one problem – the motorway ahead is closed and so I need to figure out how I get to the airport.  As it happens my son has my wife’s Garmin sat-nav on.  He can’t work it so I get off at the exit, pull over and take the Garmin.  I tap it like I am used to tapping my TomTom, it should take me to the main menu where I can work around obstructions on the route and it will recalculate.  Nothing happens.  I look at the display and I cannot figure out how I get access to main menu or the route navigation menu.  I am in a hurry so I hand it over to my son and reach for my TomTom in the glove compartment.  Within three minutes the TomTom has plotted the route (which includes the blocked motorway), I have told it to avoid the next two junctions (as they are blocked) and it has come back with a new route.  Excellent, I feel great even though it is dark, the snow is falling and the route is about twice as long.  Why do I feel great?  Because I ‘hired’ the TomTom to do a  job quickly – to work out a navigable route – and that is exactly what it has done!

Now here is the point to get.  I am in the process of buying a new sat-nav as my TomTom is old and bulky.  I had been considering whether to buy a TomTom or a Garmin and up to that point I had favoured the Garmin.  Then that incident happened.  Which product am I going to buy?  The one that is USEFUL of course – the TomTom – even though it is about 50% more expensive.  Lets ask that question differently: why would any intelligent customer willingly buy a product/service/solution that is not useful or less useful than a competing product that sells for the same/lower price?

What is the access to being perceived as useful?

Given my sat-nav experience and the work that I have done in helping design websites I would say that you absolutely have to get the following right if your non-human interfaces / touchpoints are going to occur as useful in your Customer’s world:

DEFAULTS:  you absolutely have to understand the default (the automatic) ways that your customers think and behave.  Notice that I used the Garmin the way that I am used to using a TomTom. Why?  Because the TomTom was my first sat-nav and my world of sat-nav is built entirely around my experience in using the TomTom.  Having looked into the Garmin I have found that it has similar route navigation functionality including working around blocked roads.  The issue arose because I had to access this functionality in a different way to the TomTom – a way that I was not used to and appears strange to me even now. Another example is that I always get caught out when I use computers in FranceI touch type and only when I look up at the screen do I notice that the French keyboards are set out very differently to English/American keyboards!

RESPONSIVENESS and FEEDBACK:  when the Customer touches you have to respond within a specific time and ‘speak in the Customer’s language.  We are exquisite feedback organisms – feedback is always going on and we rely on it to orient ourselves and act upon the world.  Just think of the ‘social dances’ that we are immersed in every day.  For example, conversation: those of us who do not pay attention and cut in at the wrong time do damage to the flow of the conversation sometimes bringing to an abrupt halt and/or being considered rude, dominating, inconsiderate etc.

What constitutes responsiveness to a Customer depends on the particular state that the customer is in (relaxed, hurried, stressed….), the particular job that the customer has in mind (urgent, critical, important, sometime…), the nature of the interactive device and who visible the Customer is to other onlookers.  Feedback to occur as feedback (useful feedback) in the Customer’s world it is necessary that the designers understand the backgrounds of the Customers e.g. their culture, their language, their educational level….. And of course feedback must be timely: the Customer must be able to match, easily, the feedback to the action that he last took and use that feedback to take the right next step.

When it comes to my sat-nav experience I notice that the Garmin occurred as non-responsive to my touch and the TomTom came across as responsive.  The issue with many IVR systems is that they utter (speak) rubbish: speak corporate jargon rather than use words/phrases that real Customers think in terms of and speak and as such the Customer is left pondering stuff like what menu option to hit to progress and get his job done.  Put bluntly the Customer already has a schema (mental model) or schemas of the kind of response she is expecting and your response had better fit into one of these schemas if you do not want to disrupt the harmony between you and your Customer.

USABILITY: designing the interactive touchpoint so that it lends itself to the way that customers view, process, use information, manipulate objects of its kind.  Some phones are easier to use than other phones simply because some designers better understand and cater for Customers (users) being human beings.  Some books are easier to comprehend because the information is written and presented in a way that is natural for human beings to process.  Some website are easier to user because the website designers have immersed themselves in usability and have made use of the key tricks and avoided the key traps.

You can make an interactive touchpoint highly useful (it has the content, the tools, the functionality to do the job that the Customer has in mind) and yet it does not occur as useful.  Why?  Because the designers have not put in the time, effort and love that is needed to make that touchpoint usable.  One of my key contributions in my previous role (Head of Customer Analytics and Marketing Solutions) was to take the useful models built by expert modellers and make them easy to comprehend and use by the average marketing manager who had no affinity for numbers and did not know or care about data mining or predictive analytics.

Final Words

If you are not willing to invest what it takes to make an interactive touchpoint responsive and usable then don’t waste your money making it useful!  Very few of your Customers will ever get to the stage where they will actually find the useful stuff and then actually use it: the lack of usability and responsiveness will make sure of that.

I notice that there seems to be crisis when it comes to B2B sales.  Has this something to do with the fact that most B2B sellers are simply not coming across as being USEFUL to the jobs and outcomes that B2B buyers have on their minds?   It occurs to me that the typical functions of providing information and doing demos of products and solutions is really not that compelling anymore.  Prospective buyers can access information, case studies, demos on websites, on YouTube…..  So the question becomes what jobs and outcomes do prospective buyers have in mind and what do we need to be/do to occur as useful?

Finally, I cannot help thinking that a key measure of customer-centricity is how USEFUL you occur to your Customers as view through their eyes.  What do you think?  I invite you to share your views.



How to increase (online) sales by focusing on the customer experience

Let me share an interesting experience with you

Last week I got fed up of lugging a heavy backpack around whilst travelling on business – it was putting a strain on my neck, shoulder and back.  As I was busy doing some consulting work with/for a bunch of fabulous people in Ireland I asked Sue to look into some suitable laptop bags with wheels and a telescopic handle.  This is the bag she ended up buying for me:

What is so great about this bag?  Before I answer that question I want to backtrack and let you in on the process that I went through to select this bag.

Sue did her research based on my sketchy requirements and offered me two options – two URLs.  I clicked on the first link and it took me to this bag.  I clicked on the second URL and it took me to another website and a bag that looked remarkably similar to this one.  So why did I ask Sue to buy this bag?

The first etailer is practice Sales 2.0 whilst the second etailer is firmly stuck in Sales 1.0.  What is the difference you might ask?  From my eyes, the customer’s eyes, the first etailer has looked at the sales process through my eyes and designed it such that it is a no brainer for me to buy from this vendor.  The second etailer has a product and is simply putting it on display and hoping that someone will buy it.

Who is the first etailer? Amazon.  Who is the second etailer? Some online luggage etailer – I think because I cannot even remember the name of this etailer.

Why did I buy from Amazon?

When I was faced with making a simple choice – two similar (but not identical) bags from two different etailers – how did the situation occur for me?  The most important question was this one: which bag will perform the service (‘the job’) that I have in mind?  I was not looking for a bag – I was looking for a solution to a problem!  Amazon provided reviews of this bag.  The reviews were from actual users of this bag (including a pilot) and through these reviews I was able to picture how well this bag would do the job. The competing retailer simply provided a list of product specifications – data – that simply had no meaning, no imagery, in my mind and thus did not provide the assurance I was looking for.

What was my other main consideration?  Can I count on Amazon to get this bag to me this week when I return to the UK?  Notice that I had already favoured Amazon and Amazon would only be selected out (and the competing retailer in) if it failed this test.  This was an easy question to answer because I have bought many times from Amazon and it gets my order to me within 2 -3 days. And recently, the next day – when I paid for next day delivery.

So, lets revisit this through the lens of my favoured formula: Customer Value = Benefits – Effort – Risk – Price +/- Treatment

I asked Sue to buy the bag from Amazon because Amazon created more value for me. How?  The ‘Treatment’ variable does not matter because I was interacting with websites not human beings.  The ‘Price’ variable did not matter because the price of the bags was almost identical – this bag from Amazon was slight more expensive.  That leaves three variables: ‘Benefits’, ‘Effort’ and ‘Risk’.   I had done business with Amazon before and it has an outstanding reputation (as evidenced in the latest survey) so it won hands down on ‘Risk’ – that is to say no risk in doing business with Amazon versus unknown risk with the competing etailer.  Amazon won again on both ‘Benefits’ and ‘Effort’ – Amazon, through the user reviews, did a better job of illustrating the benefits and made it easy for me to find out about these benefits.  The interesting part is that for all I know the other bag from the competing etailer may have been stronger on actual ‘Benefits’ – that is to say that it might have done the job better than this bag from Amazon.  Yet, I will never find that out because the competing etailer did not do a good enough job of illustrating those benefits.

What are the lessons?

1. We, the customers, don’t buy products we are looking to get specific job/s done through products and services. So go and figure out what the job/s are.

2. You can have the best solution to the job that your customer wants done and lose the sale if you don’t really know the customer’s needs and buying process.  So go and figure out what matters to customers (during the buying process) and how exactly they go about buying (notice I made the product decision before the vendor decision, someone else may have done it the other way around). Different customers will buy differently so ensure that you have flexibility in any process / interface that you build.

3. Take the risk out of the buying process – the product and your company.  Provide a product selector that makes it easy for the customers to select the best product for the job the customer has in mind. Provide testimonials from credible sources: customer like them, trusted independent bodies like Which? Provide figures on how many of these products you have sold and what kinds of people buy them.  Provide easy to understand, no quibble, guarantees.  By the way the more important the purchase the more the importance (weighting) of the ‘Risk’ variable: there is more risk in hiring a consultant than buying soap powder.

4. Make it easy for the customer to buy from you – take all the effort out of buying.  Look at the buying process from the customer’s eyes and take out all the obstacles.  Take out all the industry jargon that confuses customers.  Take out the complexity in any decisions the customer has to make – reduce the number of decision and reduce the effort needed to make a decision.  Reduce the number of steps.  Ask for the minimum information that you need.  Make it easy to pay through a number of different payment options.

5. Brand (reputation) matters.  I cannot help but think that I was already favouring Amazon even before I clicked the URLs.  How do I know?  Because I clicked on the Amazon URL first.  Why? Because I recognised the brand and have a positive story running around in my mind about Amazon being a great company to do business with.  If I have not done business with you before then all I have to go on is your brand (your reputation) – if I have any concerns around your brand then you increase the ‘Risk’ and that may drive me to your competitor or lead me to ask you to reduce your ‘Price’ to compensate me for that risk.  So brand is particularly important for winning new customers. 

Do you see anything that I do not see?  What are your thoughts / experiences?

Why culture is the ‘Achilles Heel’ of your customer experience efforts (Part II)

This post concludes the train of thought that I shared in an earlier post – Why culture is the Achilles Heel of your customer experience efforts (Part I). – I encourage you to read it to get the most out of this post.

Let’s forget morality and focus on ‘workability’.  By ‘workability’ I am addressing the pragmatic dimension.  For example if you want to fly a 747 from London to New York you simply need an airworthy aeroplane, the right fuel, experienced pilots, the right staff etc – these are the conditions of workability for the flight.  If you do not have these in place then your plane may get off the ground but it is highly likely to make it to New York.  So what are the conditions of workability for a customer-centric orientation that builds customer loyalty?

The foundation of customer loyalty is earning and cultivating trust

In a world full of suppliers who offer pretty much the same goods who would you choose to do business with?  If you are like most of humanity then you will instinctively do business with the one that you trust the most. Don Peppers & Martha Rogers have taken a good look at the whole trust thing in their book ‘Rules to Break & Laws to Follow’.  So allow me to share their wisdom with you.  Here are the laws that they recommend that you follow:

1. Earn and keep the trust of your customers

The key point I want to stress here is the word ‘earn’.  Yes, you need to earn it by doing the right thing (honest, fairness, integrity) as well as doing things right (competence, ease, access, efficiency…).  It means paying as much attention to the social and moral aspects as it does the economic aspect. Are you a fit and proper person/organisation?  Which is another way of asking: can you be trusted to act honorably/ethically?

2. Really taking your customer’s point of view means treating each customer with the fairness you would want if you were the customer.

At a philosophical level you can look at this either through John Rawls veil of ignorance or refer to some of the oldest philosophies used to guide human relations.  Using the lens of the ‘veil of ignorance’ ask yourself how would I design the system (roles, rules, interactions….) if I did not know if I would end up playing the role of the customer or the enterprise?  I used to use this with my two children when they would quarrel over cake: one of them got to cut the cake into two pieces and then the other one got to choose (first) which slice he wanted.  This system ensured fairness.

If we turn towards the world’s great religions then with Christianity you have the Golden Rule.  Rabbi Hillel when asked about the Torah replied “Do not do unto others that which is hateful to you, the rest is merely commentary.” Confucius stated “What you do not wish upon yourself, extend not  to others.”  Mohammed said “None of your truly believe until he loves for his brother what he loves for himself.” And in the holy book (Mahabharata) of the oldest religion (Hinduism) you have “This is the sum of duty: do naught unto others what you would not have them do unto you.”

At a practical level it means taking off your shoes and walking the shoes of your customers.  It means experiencing how it feels to pick a mobile phone plan when there are so many to choose from, so many conditions, so many variables?  It means experiencing what it is like to set-up and use the product with instructions that occurs as being useless?  It means experiencing what it is like not to be able to get hold of  helpful human being when you have an urgent need and having to navigate a ‘hard to make sense of’ IVR and so forth.  Not reading a report about it – actually experiencing it by doing it for real.

Don and Martha say it best when they write:

  • Honestly taking the customer’s perspective is really at the heart of understanding the customer’s experience with your brand or product.”
  • “…the very concept of being trustworthy that the company will not be acting solely in it’s own short-term interests.  On one level, this might involve simply giving a customer a fairer deal than she would otherwise have know about.  Or it could mean providing the information to allow her to compare competing offers directly – your competitors best offers included. It might mean being completely open with the customer when talking to her about the merits of buying a product or service….”

3. To earn your customers’ trust, first earn your employees trust.

Your employees can be the source of customer insight, competitor intelligence, ideas, creativity, innovation and judgement.  They are also the source of flexibility: they can judge the situation and respond appropriately.  And there is world of difference between giving the minimum and put our ‘heart and soul’ into your work.  The difference is called ‘discretionary effort’.  Tapping into it is like tapping into an inexhaustible gold mine.  Still not convinced?  Name one technology, one artifact, that has not been ultimately created by a person or persons working as a group.

If you want your employers to treat your customers well you have to model that behaviour: you have to treat your employees well.  In services heavy industries (such as retail, telecommunications, hotels & leisure…) your employees are absolutely critical to any form of service excellence.  To earn the trust of customers you absolutely have to earn the trust of your employees.  You do that by treating them well:  the ‘veil of ignorance’ and the Golden rule applies just as much to your employees as it does to your customers.

You would be wise if you were to apply this ethic to your suppliers and your partners.  I have been a supplier of professional services for most of my working life and my teams have given our all to those clients who have practiced the golden rule.  The rest – we stuck to the contract and did the minimum we had to do.  When disaster strikes your suppliers/partners can be your saviours or the source of your ultimate destruction: more than one company has experienced this.  When disaster struck Toyota survived because it’s suppliers did the right thing because Toyota had a history of doing the right thing by suppliers. In the UK I once heard the CEO of the best known Indian food company share (emotionally) how his suppliers pitched in to save his business when his only manufacturing facility burnt down overnight. Why?  Because he had treated them honorably.

4. If being fair to customers conflicts with your company’s financial goals, then fix your business model or get a new one.

To cultivate customer trust you must put in place a culture that calls everyone in the company – each and everyone – to genuinely consider your customers perspective and well being in each and every decision that your company makes.   Here is how Don and Martha put it: “Whenever your employees are solving a problem or undertaking an initiative, at some point they should ask themselves the question: What’s in the customer’s interest here?” And you have to act on that interest.

If we are truthful then it is highly unlikely that you have this culture today.  Your challenge is to create that culture; your biggest obstacle is likely to be the Tops, your business model and short-termism.  If you company does not create that kind of culture then you are leaving the field wide open for new entrants who build a business model around treating your customers fairly, cultivating their loyalty and reaping the benefits: think Netflix v Blockbuster (late fees) or Google v Yahoo! or Zane’s cycles v other bike sellers.

Final words

Archimedes said “Give me a lever long enough and a fulcrum on which to place it, and I shall move the world.”

Culture is the lever and the CEO (as leader) is the fulcrum:  if you have do not have the right leader and the right culture then despite your best efforts you will not succeed in cultivating customer loyalty and harvesting the benefits. At best you will win minor battles like reducing customer service costs or improving the ROI of your marketing campaigns. And in the process of seeking ‘customer gold’ you will simply make the pick axe and shovel sellers rich.

Why culture is the Achilles Heel of your customer experience efforts (Part I)

The future of most customer efforts has already been written: take a look at your culture

I came to see, in my time at IBM, that culture isn’t just one aspect of the game – it is the game.”  Lou Gerstner

Many large companies are playing the Customer game and most of them will fail.  They may succeed in improving marketing campaign ROI and reducing churn through customer analytics.  They may succeed in reducing customer service costs by implementing making it harder for customer to contact the call centres and by replacing people with self-service systems.  Yes, they may win a ‘battle’ here and their.  Nonetheless, at the strategic level (‘war’) they will fail: they will fail to build customer loyalty and reap the rewards of that loyalty.  Why?

Culture.  If you scratch the surface you find the culture within many large established companies is one of “do whatever it takes to make the numbers!”  Why is that?  Because the Tops are judged by only one thing: making the numbers.  In general, Tops do not care about people – not the flesh and blood ’employees’, nor the flesh and blood suppliers/partner, nor the flesh and blood ‘customers’.  Nor do they care about or have an intimate understanding of operations.  How can they?

They are embedded in a structure (‘system’) which views customers as objects to be manipulated and wallets to be emptied; employees are simply resources which inconveniently come in a human form and are costly hence the focus on replacing them with technology; suppliers are also resources and the objective is to pay the lowest price; laws are simply inconvenient hurdles that one can find ways around; and the rightful role of the Tops is generalship (‘strategy’).  In the world of the Tops (business or politics) the only thing that matters is making the ‘numbers’: the end justifies the means.

This grim picture is mostly hidden from view.  It is the elephant in the room that no-one wants to acknowledge as it is too threatening – it conflicts with our espoused words and values.  Yet, occasionally this elephant burst on to the world stage in a dramatic fashion:  in the USA there was Worldcom, Enron, Andersen and recently the financial crisis; and in the UK we had the MPs expenses scandal, the financial crisis and recently the News of the World phone hacking scandal.

When you exit the ‘matrix of customer babble’ you will tend to find that the real agenda and system structure can best be described as “extracting maximum value at the expense of the customer” – to borrow Fred Reicheld’s words.  Large companies and the people within them resort to any manner of tactics to pry open the customer’s wallet and get as much out of it as possible right now in this transaction, in this quarter, in this year – to make the numbers.   You can see it in the marketing dept where marketers are busy devising all kinds of ‘bait and switch’ tactics.  You can also see it in the love of ‘neuromarketing’ using insight into the human mind to manipulate customers to do what we want them to do.  You can see it in the relentless dumbing down and depersonalising of customer service…….

What is usually missing is any genuine interest in the flesh and blood customers (or employees, suppliers and partners).  And this is obvious to many of us customers and that is why we use TripAdvisor or Epinions or turn to our social networks to get at the ‘truth’ rather than the marketing claptrap.

What is often missing is any sense of fair play: honesty and integrity between words and actions.   Who is best placed to know the reality of organisational life?  The employees.  In one large publicly quoted company the Tops forced all the Middles and Bottoms to sign an ethics policy.  The following week I learned that these honorable Tops had devised a way to get around the law by using a Greek smuggler to do the dirty work and thus distance themselves from any risk.  Does that sound remarkably similar to the News of the World where policeman and private detectives were used to the dirty work.

Is my experience unique?  Not according to employee surveys, one survey that springs to mind highlighted the following:

  • 49% of employees (who responded to the survey) do not have “trust and confidence” in their company’s senior management;
  • Only 36% of employees believe that their leaders “act with honesty and integrity”;
  • 76% of employees stated that, during a recent one year period, they have personally illegal or unethical behaviours at their companies.

How can you build any kind of meaningful relationship with customers with a culture like that?  I will examine that question in part II of this post – coming soon.