Focus your customer efforts on cultivating “share of heart”

Marketers are concerned with conquesting a “share of mind” on the belief that if they stake a position – occupy valuable real estate – in the customers mind then the customer will seek out their brand.

CRM orthodoxy speaks of winning and growing a “share of wallet”.  The objective is to find ways of incentivising the customer to spend more and more with you.  A good example is Tesco – it has branched out into clothing, into electrical goods, into financial services, into mobile telephony and so forth.

If you want to build sustainable competitive advantage on the basis of creating customer loyalty then focus on growing a “share of the customer’s heart”.  The mind can be reasoned with.  Volvo may own the ‘safety’ real estate today and someone may be able to claim that real estate tomorrow.  The heart cannot be reasoned with so lightly.  The heart is much sticker.  The more that you grow a share of heart the more you will cultivate reciprocity – the customer will want to pay you back for the good heartedness that you have shown him.

Allow me to share my personal story with you.  Lets start with Amazon.  I have been doing business with Amazon since the beginning.  My relationship with Amazon was a mental (logical) one – it is easier and cheaper to buy from Amazon so I will continue to buy from Amazon.  Then one Christmas I received a present:  Amazon sent me a letter to let me know that I am a valuable customer and with the letter came a coffee mug.

Amazement and delight. I was simply amazed that Amazon had acknowledged and thanked me for being a customer – no organisation had ever done that before.  By that act alone Amazon had staked a place into my heart. How?  By acknowledging my existence, my contribution, my worth; acknowledgement is a fundamental human need.

Several years later Amazon went on to grow  its share of my heart by treating me well when I needed Amazon to fix a problem.

Two or three years ago I was planning to go on holiday in North Africa and I ordered some travel books.  And I was eager to get them quickly so that I could do the research and reserve flights and accomodation.  Well the books did not arrive when they were due to arrive.  I waited several days and became agitated that Amazon had failed me when I needed them.

I decided to contact Amazon by phone as I wanted to deal with the issue there and then.  By looking at the Amazon website I easily found a telephone number to ring.  When I did ring that number someone answered the call quickly.  At this point I was prepared to do battle with the Amazon rep.  Instead I was greeted by a friendly voice.  The voice asked me what my problem was and actually listened.  The voice empathised with my situation.  The voice told be that the books had been despatched many days ago.  The voice apologised that I had not got the books and the upset that had caused me.

The voice asked me what I wanted.  Amazing – the voice did not tell me what Amazon policy is, it asked me what I wanted.  I said that I needed Amazon to get the books to me the next day or to cancel the order so that I could go and buy them from a physical store that day.  The voice told me that a fresh set of books would be despatched that day by special courier and be with me the next day.   By the time I got off the phone I was relieved and delighted with the humanity of the interaction.  That Amazon employee had grown “share of heart”:  wow, this is an organisation that makes it easy for its customers to contact them and then treats them as human beings, as friends, as family.  In short, I had been treated with respect – a fundamental human need.

The next day, the books arrived exactly as promised – on time and in perfect condition.  That sealed the deal.  At that point Amazon had grown its share of my heart to 100%. How?  Amazon had delivered on a third and incredibly important human need – trust.

Since that day I give Amazon the first bite at the cherry and almost always they get my business even when they are more expensive.  Why?  I trust them.  They have treated me well and it is my turn to reciprocate.  I want them to grow, to be healthy – so that they can continue to treat me and the rest of their customers well.

Now Sky, despite its great marketing, is a completely story.  Through its marketing it had won a “share of my mind”.  So that when I was looking at a pay-tv, broadband and telephone bundle I went with Sky.  Then Sky went on to do the opposite of Amazon.  That is a story that I will save for another post.

Author: Maz Iqbal

Experienced management consultant working at the intersection of strategy, customer, and technology. Combine a tendency to think strategically with a penchant for getting my hands dirty at the coalface of implementation.