Category Archives: Leadership / Change / Transformation

Revisiting Strategy: Does Effective Strategy Involve More Than Strategy?

Is Strategy Purely An Exercising In Thinking?

Is strategy an analytical exercise where one collects useful data, crunches this data, finds where the opportunities lie, and then selects the most promising opportunity? Is it merely a matter of ‘scanning the landscape of opportunity’ and selecting the most suitable opportunity?  Put differently, is the job of the strategist to select which table to play at?

It occurs to me that this is pretty much the view articulated by Michael Porter – the person who really put strategy on the corporate landscape.  Arguably, it is also what Tony Hsieh is getting at when he writes the following in his book Delivering Happiness (bolding mine):

 I noticed so many similarities between poker and business that I started making a list of the lessons I learned from playing poker that could also be applied to business:

Evaluating Market Opportunities

  • Table selection is the most important decision you can make.
  • It’s okay to switch tables if you discover it’s too hard to win at your table.
  • If there are too many competitors (some irrational or inexperienced), even if you’re the best it’s a lot harder to win.

Is There More To Strategy Than Table Selection?

There might be.  It may not be as simple at selecting the right table.  Let’s get back to Tony Hsieh, he writes (bolding mine):

Strategy

  • Don’t play games that you don’t understand, even if you see lots of other people making money from them.
  • Figure out the game when the stakes aren’t high.

This is great as far as it goes. As a strategist you can sit in your ‘war-room’ crunch the ‘big data’, create a map of the opportunity landscape. And then select the right table to play at based on the consideration of two factors: the opportunity potential at a specific table, and your competence in playing the game that is played at that table.

Is this all there is to the game of strategy making?  Put differently, now that the table has been selected, can the strategist/s hand over the baton to those who excel at execution-implementation: playing the game that is played at the chosen table?  For me the answer is “No”. Why?

I invite you to consider that what is so is always in flux: change/flow/becoming/birth-death-birth characterise the world in which we find ourselves. One of the central assertions of complexity science is that a small intervention at the right place at the right time can move a stable system over the change and into a radically different state. If you grasp this then you get that there is space to act, to shape the game so as to increase your likelihood of winning.

The Work of Strategy Includes The Work Involved in ‘Tilting The Table’

If the first part of strategy can be likened to ‘selecting the right table’, then I say the second and vital part of strategy involves the work that is involved in ’tilting the table’. What do I mean by ’tilting the table’?  I mean acting on the world – orchestrating the elements of a situation – so as to generate the desired outcome. Notice, here we are in the realms of implementation (execution).

So what levers are available to the strategist who seeks to ’tilt the table’?  Let’s answer that question by imagining a scenario. Let’s assume that as the strategist you have selected the digital table to play at. How might you go about ’tilting the table’ so as to increase the odds of success?  I can think of the following levers:

  1. Actions that destabilise the existing power structure in your organisation e.g. making people changes and shifting the balance of power between business units, functions, products etc;
  2. Actions you take to ‘de-stabilise’ your key competitor/s e.g. luring away their key people;
  3. Who you choose to lead the digital transformation programme;
  4. Governance structure and rules of engagement;
  5. Resources (money, people, information, tools) that you make available to the digital transformation programme;
  6. The timescale you set for the shift to digital to occur and the associated metrics for gauging movement along the digital path; and
  7. Actions you take to make the shift toward digital necessary and attractive e.g. making promotion dependent on digital skills-expertise-projects, and funding digital education-training.

You get the idea. The levers that you can identify are limited only by your imagination, your creativity.  And some will have more leverage than others.

As a strategist, is your work finished once you have done that which you can to ’tilt the table’ in favour of your team, your organisation?  It occurs to me that the answer, again, is no.

Strategy Involves An Ongoing Attunement-Adjustment to The Facts On The Ground

Given the dynamic nature of the world in which we live and in which the game of business is played out, it occurs to me that strategy making cannot be a one-off exercise.  It occurs to me that effective strategy, in a dynamic context, is alive. What do I mean by that?  What is the core characteristic of living organisms? They are attuned to their environment. Why? Because attainment is essential for timely adjustment to occur; adjustment promotes survival.

What does this mean for the strategist? Here are the words of Tony Hsieh in Delivering Happiness (bolding is mine):

Strategy

  • You need to adjust your style of play throughout the night as the dynamics of the game change. Be flexible.

Summing Up

I leave you with the following thought: the effective strategist is one who not only has experience of the arena but is in the arena where the game is being played.  And it is this involvement and mastery of the game, along with reflection and creativity, that allows him/her to be effective in strategising.  I get that this is unconventional.

Thanks for listening, I invite you to share your thoughts-experience on the matter.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

What Is The Access to Transformation And Authentic Customer-Centricity?

What Is Transformation?

For the purposes of this conversation, when I speak ‘transformation’ I am pointing at a radical shift in one’s way of being – as in one’s way of showing up and travelling in this world.  If you are Christian, and know your Bible then think of the transformation (often called conversion) of Saul to Paul.  What was intrinsic to this transformation?  Was it not a letting go, a complete letting go, and embracing the unknown?

What Has Transformation To Do With Customer-Centric Business?

What has this conversation to do with all things Customer and especially customer-centric business?  Everything.  As I have said many times before a shift to showing up and doing business in an authentically customer-centric way requires a transformation: personal (Tops, Middles, Bottoms) and business (policies, practices, processes, tools).

a. What is the access to transformation?

What is the access to transformation at the individual (personal), and business (organisational) level?  Allow me to share the following with you:

In some Asian countries there is a very effective trap for catching monkeys. A slot is made in the bottom of a coconut, just big enough for the monkey to slide its hand in., but not big enough for the hand to be withdrawn when it is clenched. Then you put something sweet in the coconut, attach it to a tree, and wait for the monkey to come along. When the monkey slides its hand in and grabs the food, it gets caught. What keeps the monkey trapped? It is only the force of desire and attachment. All the monkey has to do is to let go of the sweet, open its hand, slip out, and go free - but only a rare monkey will do that.

- Joseph Goldstein, A Heart Full Of Peace, Best Buddhist Writing 2008

OK, this Buddhism stuff shows up for you as ‘other worldly’ – unrealistic.  So allow me to make it real for you.

b. The Transformation of Zappos Occurred in March 2003

Listen to Tony Hsieh talk about the early days of Zappos when the leadership team was struggling to find funding to keep Zappos going – the cash had run out (bolding is my work):

A month later, we still weren’t profitable. We still couldn’t raise funding.

But we had a decision to make.

How serious were we about this idea of making the Zappos brand be about the very best customer service? We had discussed the idea internally with our employees, and everyone was excited about the potential new direction.

But was it all talk? Or were we committed?

We hadn’t actually changed the way we did anything at Zappos yet. We did a lot of talking, but we weren’t putting our money where our mouths were And our employees knew it…..

For 2003, we were projecting sales to double, with about 25 percent of our overall sales coming from our drop ship business. The drop ship business was easy money. We didn’t have to carry inventory so we didn’t have any inventory risk or cash-flow problems with that part of the business. But we had plenty of customer service challenges.

The inventory feeds ….. from our vendors for our drop ship business were 95 percent accurate at best …. On top of that, the brands did not ship as quickly or accurately as our own WHISKY warehouse, which meant we had plenty of unhappy and disappointed customers. But it was easy money.

We all knew deep down inside that we would have to give up the drop ship business sooner or later if we were serious about building the Zappos brand to be about the very best customer service. We also knew that the bigger we grew, the more reliant we would be on the cash from drop shipping. There would never be a good time to walk away……

So we made what was both the easiest and hardest decision we ever had to make up until that point. In March 2003, with the flip of a switch, we turned off that part of the business and removed all of the drop ship products from our web site.

We took a deep breath and hoped for the best…..

We had to deal with our first test of our new direction right away. With a drop in revenue, cash was even tighter than before.

Now we had to figure out how to make next week’s payroll.

- Tony Hsieh, Delivering Happiness

Not easy is it?  Which kind of explains why many organisations which talk about customer focus, customer obsession, customer-centricity are playing at the periphery: making process changes, buying-implementing technology etc.  Which CEO or leadership team looks forward to taking a deep breath and hoping for the best?

Summing Up

If you are serious about cultivating genuine-meaningful loyalty between yourself and your customers then you have to open up your clenched fist. And let go of all the policies-practices-products-people that generate bad profits – profits made at the expense of your customers.

As Tony Hsieh says there is NEVER a good time to do this. So the best time to do that which goes with showing up and travelling the authentic customer-centric path is NOW! Why now?  Get this, everything that ever happens, happens NOW. I know that this is not how it shows up for you, or me. And look into this, deeply, and you will see the truth of it. All action occurs in the present, NOW.

Here is where it gets interesting. There cannot be an organisational transformation unless it is preceded by individual/personal transformation; this individual/personal transformation has to start with the Tops – it is called leadership.

What is the subtitle of Tony Hsieh’s Delivering Happiness book? “A path to profits, passion, and purpose”.   It occurs to me that the many with whom I speak show an avid interest in profits – increasing profits.  Few show any interest in any purpose other than ego: self enrichment in its many disguised. Passion?  Passion for great customer service, passion for great Customer Experience, passion for the genuine well-being of customers as fellow human beings?  If you come across it then please share it with me.

 

Which Customer Experience Path Is Your Organisation Travelling? Is It The Right One?

What Customer Experience Paths Are Organisations Taking?

It occurs to me that under the Customer Experience umbrella one can pursue several distinctive paths. What might these paths be?

One there is the lets suck less path. This almost always involves looking at way of reducing customer effort at specific touchpoints e.g. call-centre, or specific customer interactions e.g. when buying something.  Arguably some, perhaps even most, of the effort that the UK government has put into its digital services programme is about sucking less, reducing customer effort, and in the process decreasing costs.

Two, there is the data-technology path.  Let’s make use of the latest technologies (internet, social, mobile, mobile apps, kiosks, marketing platforms..) to do interesting/sexy stuff. And in the process collect-harness data on the end consumers – who have to date been unidentifiable. Take a look at just about any high profile B2C brand. For me, several automotive brands come to mind immediately.  This is the path pushed by the technology vendors and the more IT oriented consultancies.

Three, there is the customer journey / business integration path.  By this I mean lets glue up the organisation – business units (online, offline), interaction channels and business processes – so as to provide a harmonious (as a result of the integration) customer experience. What is in it for us?  Higher revenues (customer stick around more, attract new customers through word of mouth, and existing customers buy more) and reduced operating costs. A great example of this is the John Lewis Partnership in the UK.

Is this all there is? Making that which is, work better?  And using the latest shiny technology to collect data on customers, potential customers, and push out marketing messages?  Is this the extent of the possibility of Customer Experience?

What Is The Truest / Fullest Expression of Customer Experience?

Bring new light to what life might be.

- Hugh MacLeod

I say that the true-fullest possibility that is inherent in Customer Experience is that of bringing new light to what life might be.  Think Amazon. Have the folks at Amazon not brought new light what the experience of searching for, finding, reviewing and purchasing products might be?  Have they not set the benchmark for what constitutes an online store and the associated experience?

Think Apple. Some say Apple is phone company now given that this is where the bulk of revenues, profits and growth is at for Apple. How did it get that way? Did not the folks at Apple ‘bring new light to what life might be’ with a touchscreen intuitive (to use) phone?  And is it not that possibility that has been pursued consistently such that few of us would now consider being apart from our smartphones?

Think First Direct. Did the folks there not bring new light to what telephone and online banking might be?

Think The John Lewis Partnership. Did the folks there not bring new light to what life might be for the folks that work in the business and those who are served by those who work in the business?  The genuine partnership model were they are no employees. Only partners, who partner with one another to deliver great service to customers.

Think giffgaff. Have the folks at giffgaff not brought life to what life might be like for customers of mobile phone networks: life as a community?  The experience of membership, of community, of being in it together, of participation, of loyalty, of honest dealing between network and its customers?

It occurs to me that the folks that were at the helm of these companies were pursuing a vision of what life might be. Not just in the pursuit of making the numbers. They chose to tread the bold path rather the safer one of incrementalism or following the latest fashion. They led in the truest sense of leading: the invented a possibility, they enrolled people into that possibility and got busy giving birth to the unborn: what life might be.

I am finding myself becoming more and more dissatisfied with Customer Experience as practiced. Why?  Because what calls me is the possibility of ‘bringing new light to what life might be': honouring, enriching, elevating, the life of my fellow human beings.  Perhaps my interest is in innovation rather than Customer Experience. Or perhaps my interest is in innovation in the form of the total customer experience : Customer Experience Innovation. What about you?

Can Human-Centred Leadership Provide An Access To Love And Profit?

The Human Something That Makes All The Difference In Human Relationships

“I remember how one day a foreman secretly gave me a piece of bread which I knew he must have saved from his breakfast ration. It was far more than a small piece of bread which moved me to tears at the time. It was the “human” something which this man gave me – the word and the look which accompanied the gift.

—Viktor Frankl, Man’s Search for Meaning

Here is a man existing in a concentration camp. He is aware that he is being worked towards death. He finds himself starving – day after day. Yet, when he receives a small piece of bread what moves him is not the bread itself. What moves him, what leaves him grateful, is that “human” something which is brought forth and given life in the ‘word and the look’ which accompanies the gift of bread. The human something which transforms Viktor Frankl’s being from that of a thing to that of a human being.

Have we created a space for this human something to show up and dwell in the world of business?

You may be tempted to think so given all the talk of relationship, of service, of engagement, of collaboration, of partnering, of loyalty. And I am confident that many in the business world actually believe so. Yet, Look beyond this veil and you are likely to see a desert of genuine-meaningful-cooperative relating: within the organisation, and between the organisation and its customers, suppliers and partners. Behind the veil of words lies a transactional context where just about everybody finds that the most functional behaviour is to look after oneself. Where does the problem lie? Who is responsible for not putting this human something into the game of business?

Let’s listen to what Susan Scott says on the matter (bolding mine):

“The problem isn’t out there. It’s in here. We want employees to be engaged and feel included, while we ourselves are detached, distracted, disengaged, focused on our to-do-lists. We want others to bring that elusive, coveted “discretionary effort” in the door with them every day, but we don’t have the time to engage in conversations that enrich our relationships with them. We are busy, not to be found. And even when we are willing to spend more time with people, we don’t want to get to close to them. After all, there’s professional distance to maintain. Conversations and meetings that create actual intimacy make us nervous and uncomfortable. Besides, intimacy requires too much upkeep on an emotional level, and conversations and meetings that really engage and include take too much time…. When you disengage from the world, fail to include it, the world disengages too, in equal measure. It’s a two-step process, you and the world, you and your organisation. Your colleagues, associates, employees lost interest in you because you’ve lost interest in them. Calling them associates isn’t enough. If you want to engage and include the people who surround you at work, then gain the capacity to connect with them at a deep level – or lower your aim.

- Susan Scott, Fierce Leadership

What Can We Learn From the Events That Occurred At Market Basket?

It occurs to me that when it comes to the human something and the exercise of human-centred leadership (which embodies that human something) we can learn something from the events that have occurred at Market Basket. What happened? According to the Boston Globe (27th August article):

“For six weeks, we were mesmerized by the sight of thousands of grocery clerks, cashiers, and other workers protesting at stores, on Facebook, and on the front pages of this paper. They did so at great risk, without the protection of a union, not because they wanted higher wages, but merely the return of their beloved boss, Arthur T. Demoulas.”

The CEO of Tesco was ousted in July 2014 due to poor performance. Not a single employee turned up at company headquarters to demand his return to the CEO role. So why is it that thousands of employees did turn up at headquarters and demand Arthur T’s return? What makes him beloved – so highly loved? I share with you some quotes that I have come across on the net, from the likes of the Boston Globe and the LA Times (bolding mine):

“He’s a tremendous human being that puts people above profits. He can walk through a store, and if he’s met you once, he knows your name, he knows your wife, your husband, your kids, where they are going to school.

- Tom Trainor, District Supervisor

“He’ll walk into a warehouse and will stop and talk to everyone because he’s genuinely concerned about them. He cares about families, he asks about your career goals, he will walk up to part-timers and ask about them about themselves. To him, that cashier and that bagger are just as important as the supervisors and the store management team.”

- Joe Schmidt, Store Operation Supervisor

“Artie is a people person, who places people before profits; he cares about you as an individual. There’s good pay, good working conditions, good benefits. That’s why people people don’t leave.

- Joe Garon, Buyer

Leading From Any Chair: Acknowledging The Acknowledged Leaders

One can ‘lead from any chair’ according to Benjamin Zander the conductor.  Put differently, any one of us can exercise leadership no matter which position (chair) we occupy in the organisation.  That is what the folks at Market Basket have shown.  I wish to acknowledge those who show up for me as the unacknowledged leaders. The supervisors who took a stand and risked all to getting “Artie” reinstated, knowing that they were likely to be dismissed. And found themselves dismissed:

  • Tom Gordon, grocery supervisor;
  • Jim Lacourse, buyer;
  • Joe Garon, buyer;
  • Steve Paulenka, facilities and operation supervisor;
  • Tom Trainor, distribution supervisor;
  • Joe Schmidt, operations supervisor; and
  • Dean Joyce, warehouse supervisor.

How to end this conversation?

What is a fitting end to this conversation? I share these quotes with you:

Every man has to obey the voice of his own conscience, and be his own master and seek the Kingdom of God from within. For him there is no government that can control him …”

- Gandhi

“This is my commandment, that ye love one another, as I have loved you. Greater love hath no man than this, that a man lay down his life for his friends.

- Jesus (John 15:12-13)

The voice of my conscience calls me to work with you to co-create a world that works for all, none excluded. My conscience calls me to show up and travel in a manner that elevates my fellow human beings: to put into the game of life that “human” something that left Viktor Frankl touched, elevated.  It occurs to me that this is the true meaning of Social not the watered down selfish twittering that passes for social.

What about you? What does the voice of your conscience call you to? What is the possibility that it speaks and are you listening to it?

Please note that a somewhat modified version of this conversation was first published on CustomerThink in  October 2014.

What Is The Access To Innovation Including CX Innovation?

Some time ago I found myself in a workshop listening to and observing that which was occurring. As time flowed onwards and my existence kept ebbing away, i found myself sad, deflated. Here were a group of intelligent people who were charged with charting the future of their organisation. And that future included the label of ‘a customer-centric organisation’. There was much talk about customer obsession, trust, customer experience innovation etc.

So how is that I found myself sad and deflated?  I found myself present to that which did not appear to show up for the rest of the team. What was I present to? The following says it as well as it can be said:

We construct realities and then forget we were the ones that constructed them. When our relationship with reality has a kind of “is-ness”or “fixed-ness” to it, – it limits what’s possible and allows only for options like explaining, trying to fix, resisting or accepting. The answer to the question, what does it mean to be human, gets looked at only through that lens. The movie The Matrix says it well: “Welcome to the desert of the real.”

- Gale LeGassick, Landmark Education

Time and again, I find myself in meetings and workshops where the talk is lofty yet where the course of action is merely reasonable.  What magnitude of possibility lies in a reasonable course of action? Reasonable possibility. What kind of possibility is that?  More of the same and results which are merely reasonable. What is another word for reasonable? Average.

The access to new realms of possibility and the generating of extraordinary results lies in the unreasonable.  Unreasonable given the taken for granted “is-ness” yet not at all unreasonable when one lets go of the cage of “is-ness”. It occurs to me that if there was a master of ‘reality distortion’ it was Steve Jobs. Which may explain why it was that he was the source of new worlds of possibility and extraordinary accomplishment.

It occurs to me that the deeper reason that so few organisations innovate – in any dimension – is that the folks who are doing the innovating are reasonable folks taking reasonable courses of action.  What is more reasonable than going for the ‘low hanging fruit’? Or sticking to the proven methods?  Or involving only the people that have proven themselves to be good team players and safe pair of hands?

Innovation is not simply a matter of process / methodology. Nor is it a matter of tools and techniques. At its heart innovation, and that is just another word for transformation, is a matter of being: the being of the folks in the organisation, and the being of the organisation as a whole.  Only those whose being is ‘unreasonable’ have access to generating innovation and transforming business.

Put simply: plodders do not cause innovation or transformation, they simply plod along no matter what tools and techniques you put in their hands.

The accessing to innovation / transformation? Leaders: those who are ‘unreasonable’ enough in their being to put their very being at stake to bring forth, into the world, the ‘unreasonable': new worlds of possibility.

 

 

Follow

Get every new post delivered to your Inbox.

Join 4,446 other followers

%d bloggers like this: