Category Archives: Customer Philosophy

2014 State of Customer Experience: Who Are UK’s Leaders And What Can We Learn From Them? (Part 4)

Today’s conversation completes this four part series (part 1, part 2, part 3) centred on Nunwood‘s 2014 UK Analysis report. In this conversation I want to talk about CX improvement.  Specifically, what Nunwood say about what it takes to generate CX improvement.

What Does It Take To Excel At The Customer Experience Game? How Should Your Organisation Go About It?

The authors of the Nunwood report show up for me as being practical folks. They get that there is fine balance between aspiration and pragmatism. Here’s what they write (bolding mine)

For most brands, trying to improve performance simply by emulating John Lewis or First Direct can be counterproductive. Trying to move too quickly, or claiming to be something at odds with reality, can cause credibility and cultural issues. The rapid and sustainable progress of the top brands is the result of long-term, diligent investment. 

… the temptation of many chief executives ….. is to set an expectation … that the organisation will soon resemble a top 10 brand……. Transformational change is seldom less than five year project. In fact, a considerable number of brands ranked 100th to 263rd in this study have publicly held similar goals since 2010 and climbed no more than a few places over this time. Rallying cries must be credible, as well as loud. 

Equally dangerous is the risk of myopically focusing just on the immediate sector competitors, who are often only marginally different in the consumers’ eyes.

Given this what is it that the authors advise?  Here is what they say:

… the question for many brands is not how to get into the top 10 within 12 months, nor is it simply how to be the best of their immediate competitors. Rather, the best dividends come from understanding how to accelerate the rate of customer experience change. 

Which Four Critical Dimensions Do Businesses Need To Master In Order To Accelerate Customer Experience Improvement? 

According to the authors these are the four critical dimensions that businesses need to master to generate sustainable and significant improvements in CX excellence:

  1. A business is mobilised around a common vision;
  2. Customer journeys are mapped and prioritised for change;
  3. Measurement is owned by the frontline and linked to actions; and
  4. Customer experience motivates the employee experience.

As I look at these four critical dimensions it occurs to me that the only one that is ‘easy’ is the first half of the second item on the list: mapping of customer journeys.  Why is this the case? Because you can get a bunch of people together and get them doing customer journey mapping without any disruption to organisational politics or day-to-day operations.  Is that why customer journey mapping, and VoC surveying, are so common place. And action that actually changes anything worth changing so rare?

It occurs to me that it is no easy-simple task to come up with a common vision for the customer experience. And it is a major challenge to get everyone in the business to row in the same direction and in sync with one another. The devil often turns out to be in the detail. The other day I was in a meeting where all the buzzword were there: trusted, easy to do business with, personalisation, consistence…. And everyone was in agreement in this level. The fun came when it came to filling out these empty words with something concrete: What set of practices are ruled out if we are to be trustworthy? What set of practices do we need to embrace to be easy to do business with? What does personalisation actually mean? And so forth.

Take a look at number three on the list: measurement is owned at the front line and linked to actions.  Ask yourself why the call-centre agent on minimum wage, working in factory like conditions, should care, genuinely care, about owning measurement and taking action.  Or flip it and ask yourself who loses out if power moves from head office to the operations, from managers to the people who actually deal with customers?  Furthermore, for this to genuinely occur then something like the practices put forth by Deming (‘drive fear out of the workplace’) and implemented by Toyota (the workers own the design-execution-improvement of the work processes and machinery) need to occur.

Customer experience motivates the employee experience. What does this mean? I take it to mean that you start with figuring out the kind of customer experience that you propose to generate. And use this to figure out which kind of employee experience you need to cause in order for the employees to cause the customer experience you have in mind.  In many businesses, and every service business where the employees touch the customer, it means relaxing control, embracing flexibility and encouraging improvisation-creativity-responsiveness to the situation at hand.  It means treating employees as human beings rather than resources which come in the troublesome form of human being.  It means that power has to move to where the action occurs: the frontline. Who does this threaten? Managers at all levels of the organisation.

Why do I point this out? To reinforce the point that the authors make and which I shared earlier:

Transformational change is seldom less than five year project. In fact, a considerable number of brands ranked 100th to 263rd in this study have publicly held similar goals since 2010 and climbed no more than a few places over this time. Rallying cries must be credible, as well as loud. 

At this point, I ask you this question: what kind of leader and exercise of leadership plants the seeds of transformational change and then nurtures this seeds to fruition?  Can it be the kind of leaders that are commonplace today?  Which leader is going to embark in a journey which involves hardship, including putting one’s reputation and selfhood at stake, and which not yield fruits for at least five years?  It occurs to me only one that it is going to be there in a leadership role for much longer than five years.  Now think of Jeff Bezos at Amazon, or Tony Hsieh of Zappos, Steve Jobs at Apple, Richard Branson at Virgin…

That concludes the conversation on Nunwood’s 2014 UK Analysis report. I hope that I made some contribution to you. Thanks for listening.

 

2014 State of Customer Experience: Who Are UK’s 2014 Leaders And What Can We Learn From Them? (Part 3)

This conversation continues on from where the earlier one ended. As promised, I have been looking at what Nunwood has to say about certain brands. And find myself in a position to share with you the table that I have put together:

2014 Nunwood CX Leaders Table

 What Does It Take To Be A Customer Experience Excellence  Leader?

Just about everyone I come across business is looking for the answer, the recipe, the formula for turning the ordinary into extraordinary, base metal to gold; Nobody has or makes the time to linger, to think and rethink, to grapple with, experiment, and finally arrive at a home made ‘solution’ to any serious challenge.  So is there a recipe/formula for CX excellence?

If there is, then it is worth taking a look at First Direct as it is in top place in 2014 and has consistently been in the top 10.  Here is what the folks at Nunwood say on the matter (bolding mine):

The First Direct formula is remarkably simple one, yet it has proved difficult to implement in other organisations: remove the barriers between customers and the bank; employ people who want to serve the customer and care about doing a good job; train them intensely and empower them to handle and resolve any issues brought to them by the customer.

What does this look like from a customer perspective? Let’s listen to a First Direct customer:

 I was in Venice when my credit card was refused and it was quite stressful. I phoned First Direct and talked with a patient man with a great sense of humour who spent time talking to me about the holiday, acknowledged this this was a stressful thing to happen and worked methodically to sort thing out. I rarely phone First Direct as I can do almost everything online, but is was so important that when I needed them, they were unfailingly polite, human and ready to treat me as valued customer.

What Is It That Is Missing From The CX Game Of Excellence?

I have read the Nunwood report several times.  And putting this report together with other reports and my lived experience I find myself thinking “There is no rocket science here!” and find myself in agreement with the author of the Nunwood 2014 UK CX report when they say (referring to First Direct) that the formula for CX excellence is a remarkably simple one.  So why is it that so many brands fail to make any meaningful shifts/progress in CX excellence?  Allow me to point at what occurs to me as ‘that which is missing the presence of which makes all the difference’ by sharing a personal story with you.

Earlier this week I was due to be at an important meeting in central London at 10:00.  Seven people were counting on me to be there to ‘chair’ the meeting. I was counting on myself to be there to chair the meeting.  The unexpected occurred on my way to the rail station. I found myself at a stand still on the road for 45 minutes or so. I took the next train – thirty minutes later than I had planned.  This meant that my contingency was gone – everything had to work out just right if I was to make that meeting on time. I arrived at Paddington Station and made my way hurriedly toward the underground. Suddenly, I found my feet sliding, no control, left knee smacks into the hard tile floor, right leg twists awkwardly, the right ankle is in some pain. A helpful gentlemen helps me up. I recover and get that the floor has become an ice rink in some place (food for a future post). I walk slowly, in pain, towards the underground. The up escalator is out of action so I make my way up the stairs – slowly and awkwardly, in pain. I walk for several minutes to the underground entrance. It is closed. I ring both of my colleagues and the client to let them know that I am likely to be late.

Making my way to the taxi rank I notice a long queue and get that if I wait there I will not get to the meeting on time. So I make my way down the stairs and out of Paddington Station. Leaving the station, the rain falls down and I start getting wet. I walk away from Paddington station and towards central London. Why? I get that I have to get far enough away from the station to find an empty taxi. As I am walking I am in pain and mindful that I have to walk carefully on my sprained ankle. After walking for 5 – 10 minutes I find a black cab. I tell the cab driver that he is blessing, a Godsend. We arrive at the client’s office – five minutes after the meeting has started.  What do I find?  The meeting is on the sixth floor and all the lifts are out of service. What do I do? I embrace the pain, walk as mindfully and carefully as I can, and make my way up the stairs to the sixth floor.  I chair the meeting, we do what needs to be done. Just after noon I leave and make my way home as I am in considerable pain.

What was it that allowed me to overcome a series of obstacles and considerable pain to honor my commitment? Absolute commitment to the commitments that I make: playing full out to honor my word.  Ask yourself how often you find that kind of commitment when it comes to the CX realm. Now you have your answer to why it is that so few are CX Excellence Leaders and most are languishing in ‘no mans land’ of averageness.

Enough for today. In the next post I will bring this series of post on the Nunwood 2014 UK CX report to a close.  I wish you a great day and thank you for your listening.

What Does It Take To Shift To A Human-to-Human Way Of Doing Business?

I find myself interested and caring for the human.  So the following slogan caught my attention: “There is no more b2b or b2c: It’s human to human”.  This got me wondering: What does it take for us to show up and operate as ‘human to human’?

If we are to do business in a ‘human to human’ way then it helps to have a good grasp of what the defining characteristic of human is.  In Being and Time, Heidegger asserts that ‘Care (Sorge) is the being of dasein’. For the purposes of this conversation dasein = human being. What does Heidegger mean by this?  I take it to mean that I do not find myself indifferent: to myself and my experience of living, to the world in which I find myself in, to my fellow human beings.  It matters (to me) how I live and how my life turns out. It matters (to me) how my fellow human beings live and how their lives turn out. And it matters (to me) how this world is and is not.  I care as I am aware that I am being-in-the-world-with-others-towards death.

If we are going to show up and operate from a ‘human to human’ way of doing business then we must genuinely care for ourselves, the people we work with, the people we sell to, the people we buy from, the people whose lives are touched by us and our way of showing up and operating in the world.  How best to illustrate this?  Allow me to share a story the following story with you (bolding is my work):

Harry, an emergency physician …. One evening on his shift in a busy emergency room, a woman was brought in about to give birth…….. Harry was going to deliver this baby himself. He likes delivering babies, and he was pleased…… The baby was born almost immediately.

Whilst the little girl was still attached to her mother, Harry laid her along his left arm. Holding the back of her head in his left hand, he took a suction bulb in his right and began to clear her mouth and nose of mucus. Suddenly, the baby opened her eyes and looked directly at him. In that moment, Harry stepped past his technical role and realised a very simple thing: that he was the very first human being this baby girl had ever seen. He felt his heart to go out to her in welcome ….

Harry has delivered hundred of babies. He has always enjoyed the challenges of delivery, the excitement of making rapid decisions and feeling his own competency, but he says that he had never let himself experience the meaning of what he was doing before. He feels that in a certain sense this was the first baby he ever delivered. He’s says that in the past he would have been so preoccupied with the technical aspects of delivery, assessing and responding to needs and dangers, the he doubts he would have noticed the baby open her eyes or have registered what her look meant.  He would have been there as a physician but not as a human being. It was possible, now to be both…

-Rachel Naomi Remen, Kitchen Table Wisdom

This is what I notice about the whole Customer thing: the focus is almost exclusively on the technical stuff (metrics, data, analytics, technology, processes) and almost no recognition of the human.  Does this matter?  Yes. Why?  I leave you with these words of wisdom:

 

Quality matters when quantity is an inadequate substitute. If a building contractors finds that her two-ton truck is on another job, she may easily substitute two on-ton trucks to carry the landfill. On the other hand if a three star chef is ill, no number of short-order cooks is an adequate replacement. One hundred mediocre singers are not the equal of one top-notch singer…

- Richard Rumelt, Good Strategy Bad Strategy

We may not be able to define-measure-calculate quality. Yet we are present to it when we experience it. The quality that you/i/we experience from the people we interact with, work with, sell to, buy from, makes a huge difference to our experience of living.  This quality of caring cannot be faked, though many folks make the attempt to fake it.

Interestingly, in our age, it is easier to build this caring into the ‘product’ itself (Apple) or the digital interface (Amazon) than it is in human to human conversation-encounters.  Why?  Because we have become so wrapped up in the technical that we have lost touch with the human – including our own humanity.  Yet, it is possible to get in touch with this humanity and give it expression: to show up as a CEO and as a human being; to show up as a CMO and as a human being; to show up as CFO and as a human being; a sales person and as a human being; to show up as call-centre agent and as a human being……

Please note: I am about to go on vacation and will be out of touch for several weeks.  I wish you well and look forward to being in communication after the holiday.

Is The Way We Are Going About Customer Acquisition and Retention Dead Wrong?

In light of the Comcast call that went viral I invite you to listen to these wise words (bolding is my work).

There is no question that acquiring and retaining customers is vital to every company, but it’s the way companies are going about it that’s dead wrong…..

Charles Green, coauthor of the Trusted Advisor, points out that many companies have the client focus of a vulture – the pay close attention to what clients are up to, but only in order to figure out the right time to pounce and tear at their flesh….

Sales plans, computerised data sharing, and advertising strategies are not relationship-building vehicles. While an automated phone system may improve an organisation’s operational efficiencies, it rarely improves the customer experience. In fact, most have the opposite effect…..

The point is, though we can learn the language of our industry, sit up straight, dress appropriately, and speak knowledgeably about product, when the conversation doesn’t feel natural, doesn’t respond precisely to the customer’s questions, doesn’t engage the customer in an authentic way, there will ultimately be no sale. And no matter how many time we hear the same feedback ……., we struggle to behave differently because we don’t know how to get beyond our customer facing “script”. Besides, we aren’t particularly interested in, much less skilled at “seeing” and responding to, each customer as a one-of-a-kind human being….

Today, more than ever, consumers are seeking to be acknowledged as unique individuals with lives, needs, tastes, and desires that differ widely from those around them….

So, assuming your products or services are of good quality and competitively priced, one of the most powerful differentiators has to do with conversations you have with customers. The conversation is the relationship ….

No matter what your job is …… the key is your context, your beliefs about your responsibility to customers and the relationships you intend to enjoy or endure with them … if I’m in the checkout line at my grocery store (or any checkout counter anywhere in the world) it would be easy for you to think that you are doing your job if you ring up the sale and hand me my purchases, the correct change, and a receipt. That you get points for using my name …. That if you have a customer loyalty program, you get more points for asking me for my membership card so you can check to see if I can get a discount….

But, I’ll tell you what makes the real difference. That you look into my eyes and connect with me, even if only for a seconds. Human to human. A real smile suggests, “I see you”. This seems like such a small thing, perhaps foolish to some, yet it’s what we all want, deep down where it counts. To be seen.

I’m reminded of the African greeting sawu bona, which means “I see you.” The response is sikhona, which means “I am here.” The order is important. It’s as if until you see me, I don’t exist. Raking your eyes quickly over someone’s face is not seeing them. So if you want to see your customers, really look at them. What takes mere seconds can make people return again and again.

- Susan Scott, Fierce Leadership

If insanity is doing the same stuff over and over and expecting a different result then it occurs to me that many of us who are working on the Customer stuff can be labelled insane. Relationship is not merely the sum of a series of interactions. Relationships do not reside in CRM databases.  Communication is more than bombarding customers with sales messages across any number of channels. Personal is more than sending the customer emails and addressing her by using her name. Engagement is more than a customer opening up your email and clicking your offer.  Customer Experience is more than a new name for the Customer Services function.

I dedicate this to conversation to a fellow human being (and friend) who gets and lives that which Susan Scott is communicating:  Lonnie Mayne, President of InMoment.

What Kind Of Communicating Generates An Uplifting Customer Experience?

The Interplay Between Communicating & Relating

The relating that occurs between human beings is a function of the communicating that is occurring between these human beings; the communicating that is occurring between human beings is function of the relating that is occurring.  Which is to say that the communicating and relating are essentially in a dynamic dance with one another.

Which is primary? It occurs to me that communicating is primary: as linguistic beings we cannot help but communicate and this communicating influences/shapes relating. It is through your communicating with me that I get access to your relating to me: how you see me, how you are positioning yourself in relation to me, how you are likely to treat me, whether I can trust you or not, whether you are ‘giver’, a ‘matcher’, or a ‘taker’.

If you get this then you get the critical importance of the communicating that occurs between the people in an organisation and the customers of the organisation. How the people in your organisation communicate with customers will impact the customer experience – sometime dramatically. Let’s take a look at two examples and listen to their impact.

The Marketer’s Way Of Communicating With Customers

Take a look at this email from ILX . Pretty graphics aside, this is what the email says:

Let us pay your exam fee!

WE’VE MISSED YOU

As a previous ILX customer we just wanted to touch base with you and see how your training went and more importantly find out if your career has benefited from gaining new qualifications with us!

We have included a free Best practice map PDF for you which may help you work out what your next step could be. Download PDF >

Is there anything we can help you with in furthering your qualifications? We are here and ready to give you any assistance that you may require.

Maybe you’re considering another course with ILX?

We are constantly developing our e-learning to ensure it’s the best in the industry so you get the highest quality learning that we can provide.

We hope to hear from you soon!
Quote MISSYOUEMAIL when contacting us

If you have more than five people who wants to take part in our e-learning please contact one of our dedicated team for the best offers at sales@ilxgroup.com or call us on +44 (0)1270 611 600
http://www.ilxgroup.com

What was my experience on opening-reading this email communication? This communication showed for me as inauthentic: false.  How can ILX miss me? The people in this organisation do not know me!  And if they genuinely wanted to touch base with me and find out how my training went then why did they not call me a year ago when I actually took the training? And what do they mean by “Is there anything we can help you with in furthering your qualifications?”  They certainly don’t mean help as in help of the everyday human kind. What they mean is, what can we persuade you to buy from us in the guise of helping you.

So how am I left feeling about ILX? I am left feeling that ILX is just another ‘taker’ organisation looking to extract as much money as they can from me. Especially now that summer is here and people will be taking holidays rather than taking courses.  So their offer to pay my exam fee is no act of generosity.

The Human Way To Communicate With Your Customers

Take a look at the following email and ask yourselves how you would be left feeling on opening-receiving this email:

maz,

Thank you!

We just received your order and will process it within 48 hours.

Your order # 204-0742925-4073103 shows the following items:

Love and Profit: The Art of Caring Leadership

If you have any questions or issues with this order please email us by replying to this message or email us at [email removed].

If you have any concerns at any time about this order, please email us right away with your Order ID#.

Thank you!

 

Sincerely,

Melissa

Supervisor

Customer Service

I found myself surprised and delighted. Why? Because this email speaks to me as I wish to be spoken with: it is everyday communication between two human beings.  It oozes the kind of humanity that speaks to me: friendliness, warmth, caring. I find myself wanting to know more about this organisation (Slategrey Books UK) and about Melissa.

Why Have I Shared This With You?

If you are serious about showing up and competing on the basis of the Customer Experience then you need to pay attention to the quality of your communicating with your customers.  Take a good look at your communications across the customer journey ask yourself if your communications are generating the kind of customer experience that builds connection. If they are not then you are likely to be better off using the services of good copywriters than spending a fortune on marketing automation systems that ultimately will enable you to deliver ‘junk’ to your customers at scale.  And in the process annoy customers like me who then end up sharing their experience on social media – just like I am doing now.

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