Who Are the UK’s 2013 Customer Experience Leaders And What Can We Learn From Them? (Part 2)

This post continues the conversation started in the earlier post which disclosed the UK’s Top 10 Customer Experience brands and provided an analysis of the Top 100 brands by industry.

Nunwood’s Six Pillars of Customer Experience

The folks at Nunwood claim “we have used advanced text analytic techniques to derive and then statistically validate the six most important factors that customers talk about when it comes to great experiences”.  What are these factors?

Personalisation: using individualised attention to drive emotional engagement

Time & Effort: valuing the customers time – minimising the effort and creating frictionless processes

Expectations: managing, meeting and exceeding customer expectations

Integrity: being trustworthy and engendering trust

Resolution: turning a poor customer experience into a great one

Empathy: achieving an understanding of the customer’s circumstances to drive deep rapport

What can we learn about these six pillars of Customer Experience by looking at the Top 10 brands?

In their report Nunwood list the top brands by each of the Customer Experience pillars. So:

  • Amazon sits at the very top for the Personalisation and Time & Effort pillars;
  • Virgin Atlantic is the leader in the Expectations pillar;
  • John Lewis leads when it comes to the Integrity pillar; and
  • QVC leads in both the Resolution and Empathy pillars.

What is not easy to do, from the report, is to see at one glance what each of the Top 10 brands does in terms of these six pillars. So I have taken some time to piece that together for you and here it is:

Top10 CEE Six Pillars Analysis

Coming Next

In the next and last post, I will share with you details of the “brands that have cracked the code” and are making major leaps forward – according to Nunwood. And in particular I will single out one brand that shows up for as being truly innovative in its business model, in customer engagement, in being social and making online community work, in putting its customers truly at the centre of its way of doing business.  I also happen to be a customer of this brand.

Posted on November 17, 2013, in Brand, Case Studies, Culture, Customer Engagement, Customer Experience, Customer Philosophy, Customer Service and tagged , , , , , , , , , , , , . Bookmark the permalink. 3 Comments.

  1. Maz, you have hit my hot buttons. Why do we need

    “advanced text analytic techniques to derive and then statistically validate the six most important factors that customers talk about when it comes to great experiences”

    to point out the blindingly obvious?

    Maybe we really need a little less analysis and a little more action

    Like

    • James,
      I find myself in perfect agreement with you. And if you are a ‘consultancy’ selling your ‘secret sauce’ then you will make the simple into the complex. So I can see why it is that Nunwood point to their ‘secret sauce’ or why Beyond Philosophy make a big deal of their ‘secret sauce’ around customer experience. For me, it shows up as salesmanship.

      Put simply: one cannot sell and get rich on selling the blindingly obvious.

      All the best,
      Maz

      Like

  2. Hi Maz,
    I would suggest that Nunwood’s report is useful insofar as it identifies favourites but your analysis of what the identified brands to to deliver exceptional service is much more insightful and useful. Thank you and well done.

    Adrian

    Like

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