State Of CX 2015 – Nunwood’s UK Analysis: What Are the Key ‘Findings’ (Part 1)

It’s the time of the year where I share my take on the latest CX research published by Nunwood. Worth pointing out that Nunwood has been acquired by KPMG so is now KPMG-Nunwood. Back to the research titled: A New Era of Experience Branding. You can download this by going to the KPMG-Nunwood website.

Today, I went to kick of this series of conversations by sharing what I consider to be the key ‘findings’  (conclusions and/or assertions) that come out in the research paper published by KPMG-Nunwood.  In no particular order, these are:

The UK is being outperformed particularly by the USA:

Our US report showed that the leading US firms are some five years ahead of the UK. The average US consumer is 10 times more likely to have an excellent experience than UK counterparts.

UK, as a whole, has made scant progress over the last two years:

This year’s analysis is a story of “diamonds in the rough”: shining examples of best practice surrounded by mediocrity.  The great customer experience project is failing for many organisations….the overall score remains static for the second year in succession.

No silver bullet that leads to CX transformation:

… there is no silver bullet, no single idea that will lead to transformation.

UK firms are failing because they are not doing the right things in the right order:

… much of the lacklustre performance in the 2015 UK results is due to the premature focus on rich, complex experiences at the expense of business basics…… It requires a progressive approach which, in NPS terms, deals with the causes of detraction first, before attending to the drivers of promotion

CX excellence is more of a marathon than a sprint:

Mistakenly, many UK brands promise to be ‘best in class’ within challenging timescales, damaging their internal and external credibility. Much like training for a marathon, the most effective focus should be on….

No substitute for a controlling idea that animates the whole organisation:

At the very centre of the most successful customer experiences lies an idea….. so powerful and motivating that it infuses and energises all it touches.

A controlling ideas is different to a brand idea because it shapes the mind-set of the whole organisation, not just the marketing and sales teams.

Our research shows that the keepers of the flame have to be the CEO and the executive team.

Employees matter, they are the gateway to CX excellence:

The employee experience precedes the customer experience. Culture, engagement and enablement all play a vital role.  The great organisations start with these factors first.

Organisations which aspire to be CX leaders must master omni-channel:

.. the US corporates have a largely different approach to the adoption of digital technologies. In the US, it is simply an extension of the business model – an additional way to engage with the customer – in an integrated ecosystem with the customer at the centre. In the UK, by contrast, digital…. seen … as a separate line of sight to the customer, a different channel with different products, prices, and costs.

The next conversation in this series will be about the five customer experience themes (trends) that KPMG-Nunwood consider to be key.  Until then I wish you the very best and thanks for listening.

Customer Experience: Beware The Data Trap

Data. It is being made out to be sexy – really sexy. Many folks even think that collecting mountains of data and stuffing it into CRM and/or marketing automation systems is the access to delivering great customer experiences.  They are mistaken. Collecting mountains of data can be useful to marketers in helping them achieve higher direct marketing ROI through better targeting. It may allow the folks in operations to tune aspects of operations. That is about it.

What is the basis of the assertion that I am making? Lived experience. I invite you to ponder the following:

To describe me as weighing a certain amount is …. to “disregard the existential state of being-in”. It is to describe me  in a way in which one may describe any physical object. I can weigh x pounds as a living Dasein or a corpse, it makes no difference.

So, if we disregard a person’s existentially and treat him or her simply as a physical object, we can describe that person in terms of his or her factual determinations. In doing so, however, we are missing what makes his or her life the life it is. People do not just weigh x pounds: they live such a weight as being overweight or underweight or as being indifferent to their weight. Weight, as a way of being-in-the-world, is not an indifferent physical property, but rather an existentiall condition. We may similarly between biological sex and gender, between physical height and stature.

– William Blatner, Heidegger’s Being and Time

I say that if you are to excel in the domain of designing and staging great customer experiences then it is not enough to collect masses of data. Collecting data can actually be a distraction from the real task. What is the real task? The real task is to get a handle on the facticity of your customer’s life: a gut level grasp of his/her life and in particular what makes his/her life the life it is.  Data of the kind that ends up in databases cannot and will never provide this kind of insight.

Does this kind of insight into your customers matter? Yes.  This is the kind of insight that allows you to come up with business models, value propositions, products, services, and customer experiences that attract and retain the customers you have chosen (intentionally or accidentally) to serve. It is also the kind of insight that you need to call forth the very best from the people that work for you and work with you. This requires a level of humanness that is rarely given space in established large organisations.

If you do not get the passage that I have quoted above then I say you are wasting your time in the Customer Experience sandbox. You’d be better off in the direct marketing, CRM, or operations optimisation. If you do not get this passage and choose to continue playing in the CX sandbox then know that is perfectly OK. Why? Because you will find many like you in the CX sandbox – you are in the majority.

Thanks for listening. I wish you a great day.

Customer Experience: The Road Less Travelled

It has been a while since the last conversation. First, I took time out for a month of holidays. And then in September I was asked to lend a hand in a CX centred next generation CRM and omnichannel programme.  Given the demands on my time I will be keeping this conversations short – at least shorter.

Let’s start.  It occurs to me that just about every organisation is talking about the importance of the customer experience. Many may even be doing something under the label of Customer Experience.  Few are going about it in a way that tilts the scales towards success.  What, in my opinion, tilts the scales towards success?  This is what has been unconcealed to me to date:

  1. CEO totally committed in his very being to competing on the basis of insanely great customer experiences with the organisations products, people, interaction channels, the brand, and the organisation as a whole;
  2. An organisation which is impeccably organised (people, policies, practices, processes, partners, interaction channels, technology) around the principle of ‘producing’ insanely great customer experiences;
  3. Managers who tackle anything and everything that gets in the way of the people in the organisation ‘producing’ insanely great customer experiences;
  4. An organisational climate where breakdowns and honest communication are welcomed as an opening for learning that feeds the thinking, design and ‘production’ of insanely great customer experiences.
  5. Genuine competition (and/or effective regulation) that generates motivation within the organisation’s leadership and management teams to compete for the customers business and loyalty.

It occurs to me that this is the road less travelled. Why?  It is a very demanding road. It is not a road for sprinters – those seeking a return in a year or so. It is road only for ‘marathon runners’ who put in impeccable effort consistently, make substantial sacrifices, and who tolerate (even welcome) pain beyond what they are comfortable with.

Thanks for your listening. I wish you the very best. As the French say until the next time….

Customer Experience Through The Eyes Of The Frontline Retail Employee

Perspective. If we are to improve the performance of human worlds (couple, family, neighbourhood, team, department, business, nation…) perspective taking is essential. It occurs to me that the simplest form of perspective taking is attentive-receptive listening to those who find themselves embedded in the human world that one is interested in.  The deepest from of perspective taking is to enter into the lives, and live the lives, of those whose perspective one wishes to become intimately familiar with.

What did I learn when listened to the perspective (lived experience) of frontline retail employees who work for one of the big UK retailers?

On many days the store is short-staffed. Those who are present and ready for work find themselves stressed. The standards are high – for merchandising, store cleanliness, customer service…  There is a lot to get done. The pressure is on. This calls people to take short-cuts (including putting their health & safety at risk), bypass policies and practices to do that which needs to be done.

The folks dealing with customers on the frontline are not adequately trained – as in training that comes through apprenticeship.  Why are they not adequately trained? Because the stores are short-staffed. Due to the short-staffing, the pressure is on to throw new frontline employees into the deep end. This places the new employees under stress: these employees face demanding customers, they are aware that their colleagues are counting on them, they know that their manager is judging them, and they are intimately aware that they lack the contextual understanding and experimental know-how to do things well.  They do their best. And their best is not enough. They are aware that their best is enough.

Folks distant and cut-off from the reality of the world of the store (that particular store) make decisions for that store. These decisions whilst sound in theory are impractical given the reality of that store.  Yet the folks in that store – including the manager of that store – have no power to affect or challenge these decisions. So there are substantial and frequent store refreshes and not enough staff to merely do the day to day tasks. The product range is expanded and there is not enough shelf space. Customers complain of products not being in stock yet the replenishment decisions are made by computers and remote others in charge of store replenishment. New machinery is introduced that does not fit well into the store and makes lives harder for the folks in the store ….  All of this increases the level of stress experienced by the folks working in the stores.

Customers are demanding at best, rude at their worst. They demand perfection: a seamless experience. They are encouraged in this demanding-ness by the folks higher up in the business who designate and promote services (and service standards) which are impractical given the reality of that store. Folks serving these customers want to provide a good service and experience a certain kind of human encounter with customers. Yet, they find themselves in a reality in which providing merely an average customer experience is all that can be reasonably provided.  They experience the withering look of many customers. And some customers, more and more these days, who are condescending, critical, and rude. All of this increases the level of stress experienced by these front line employees.

Their employer and their manager does not care for them. The folks experience themselves as not appreciated, not valued, not loved.  It is not just that these folks are paid the minimum wage. It is not just that if they arrive five minutes late for work then fifteen minutes of pay is docked. It is not that they are expected to stay up to half an hour later than their shift and they do not get paid for this half an hour. It is not that they are not adequately trained. It is not just that they are rarely given their allotted lunch break. It is more. It is the gap that they experience (on a daily basis) between the way the company expects them to treat customers and the way they are treated by the company. Is it then any surprise that the stores are regularly and frequently short-staffed – in numbers and in terms of experience/cable employees?  Who wants to work in such an environment? And even those who do work in such an environment quit as soon as the can quit.

If you are working in an organisation and concerned about improving the customer experience,  I end by posing the following questions:

  • Are the folks that work for us and with us less worthy of care, consideration, and respect than folks upon whom we change the label Customer?
  • What is the likelihood that at a distance voice of the customer surveys unconceal the kind of reality that I have shared with you here – the reality of the folks interacting directly with customers?
  • Do your customer journey maps give you an adequate feel for the lives of customers and the lives of the people on the front lines who interact with your customers on a daily basis?

If you are a customer then ask you to be mindful of human worth and dignity in your dealings with the folks that serve you – especially when things are not going right. I ask you to consider that the person is not merely an employee. S/he is a human being who is doing the best s/he can given the circumstances s/he finds herself in.  If you were in h/er position you would most likely do that which s/he is doing.  A kind word can light up the world.

I thank you for your listening it is that which continues to call me to share my speaking with you.  I leave you to grapple with what I have shared and make it mean that which you make it mean

How Well Does The Behaviour Of Customers Conform To Customer Experience Dogma?

CX Dogma: In Today’s World The Customer Experience Is Critical

What do the CX gurus say?  Do they not proclaim the critical importance of Customer Experience?  Do they not assert that in the age of social media Customer Experience is everything?  Do they not say that those organisation that do not pay attention to the Customer Experience will go out of business?

What does the research around Customer Experience say?  Does this research not find that the Customer Experience matters to customers: that customers want easy access to critical information; that customers want a seamless/effortless experience; that 80% of customers will switch to another supplier after one poor experience?

Allow me to sum this up: In today’s business climate the health of a business depends on providing a good to great Customer Experience as customers expect nothing less and will readily switch after one poor experience

Let’s Do A Thought Experiment

You wish to buy a car. You go to a dealership and are greeted by a salesman who tells you that he is not paid on commission. This reassures you – no high pressure selling to guard yourself against. Thereafter, a test drive takes place. You ask for the price and receive it written on the back of the salesman’s business card. So far good – a refreshing difference to your experience with a different car dealer.

After consulting with your wife you decide to buy the car. You ask for the paperwork: formal quote, details of the warranty, and lease payments if decide to lease rather than buy. What happens?  How does the salesperson respond to your request? Here are your words:

We expected this to be forthcoming, so we were surprised when we were informed that this wasn’t possible and he’d given us all the figures.

Being worldly you ask for the sales contract. What happens? The salesman refuses to email it to you. He says it is standard contract and implies that you are making a big deal of nothing: the contract is a standard contract and is signed hundreds of times a day. You are not impressed. You realise that all of your correspondence with the salesperson has been through his person Yahoo account. You have no formal paperwork from the dealership itself.

What do you do?  What does all the research that backs the vital importance of Customer Experience say you will do? I say that CX dogma says that you will not buy from this salesperson, this dealership. You have asked for the basics and you have not gotten the basics. You have been treated unprofessionally – even badly. A poor Customer Experience! Besides all the warning signs are there.

CX Reality: Customer Behaviour Is Not In Line With CX Dogma And Customer Surveys

Ok you being a rational person, one whose behaviour is in line with what you said on the customer survey walk away. You walk away and find a different dealer – a dealer that provides you with the kind of premium Customer Experience you would expect when buying a premium product (Lincoln).

What does the CX guru do?  I share with you his words:

Despite our frustration, we placed the order (reluctantly) as their price was the lowest by far of any other quote we received

Price trumps Customer Experience!  Even for a CX guru who loudly proclaims the critical importance of the Customer Experience (to attracting and keeping customers) price trumps Customer Experience!  

In the real world the quality of the Customer Experience is only one factor. I refer you back to Thinking Strategically About CX: Five Components of Customer Value and this formula:

  • Value = Benefit – Effort – Risk – Price +/- Treatment

What may this formula unconceal?  It conceal the multi-dimensionality of human life: humans juggle, without even being aware of this juggling, many factors such as convenience (effort), risk, price, and the way that they are treated by a supplier. As well as the benefits they will get.

Does CX Dogma and Customer Research Get Anything Right About Customers?

Yes. Can you guess what CX dogma and customer research gets right?  Customers love to complain about how badly they are treated by suppliers. Allow me to end this conversation by sharing the words of the CX guru:

.. we received no letter of confirmation or thanks for ordering the car–no sign of appreciation or documentation of any kind. We were quoted six to eight weeks for delivery. What followed next was missed dates and failure to contact us when promised regarding the delivery…..

Suffice it to say, we were not overly impressed with our experience at Lincoln either. Nor our subsequent treatment by their Finance arm in setting up the lease payments, another whole story in itself.

If you wish to read the original post by the CX guru where he shares his experience and his learnings then Colin Shaw: Destroying The Brand One Experience At A Time.

Final Thoughts

Human living is messy. Be wary of CX gurus and their simplistic pronunciations. Beware of CX dogma: theory alway simplifies and distorts especially when it comes to human beings and human worlds. Be wary of customer research – those who pay for it to be carried out and promoted do so to push a particular agenda.  Be wary of technology vendors – CX worship is the latest techniques to sell tech, the tech itself and its impact on the Customer Experience is questionable.

I invite you to consider that if Customer Experience was as critical as it is then the business world would be desolate one inhabited only by a few stellar brands like Apple, Zappos, Amazon, John Lewis, USAA…. The reality is that ‘not great CX brands’ are legion and they continue to do survive and prosper.

Disagree?  I invite you to share your perspective / experience by commenting.

I thank you for your listening – your listening keeps me speaking despite the increasing temptation to keep silent. My particular thanks to Ilan Kirschilan for reaching out to me this week ( to let me know that my speaking speaks to him) and thus bringing me out of my hibernation.

The Customer Speaks: Customer-Centricity Through The Eyes Of The Customer

I hear you.

I hear you say that you (as an organisation) are customer friendly.

I hear you say that you (as an organisation) have a strong customer orientation.

I hear you say that you (as an organisation) are committed to delivering great customer service.

I hear you say that you (as an organisation) deliver a great customer experience.

I hear you say that you (as an organisation) are customer-centric.

I even hear some of you say that you (as an organisation) are not merely customer centric, you are customer obsessed!

Yes, I hear you – all of you. And you all sound pretty much the same.

I have a question for you. Can you guess what my question is?  If you are so in tune with your customers (folks like me) then you should have no issues in figuring out my question. Have you figured it out?

Here is my question (in various guises) as your customer: What specifically can I count on you for?  What is your promise to me?  What is it that you guarantee me?  

No! I am not interested in hearing about your mission statement nor your corporate values.

No! I am not interested in your brand positioning or values.

No! I am not interested in your size, your growth, your global scale…

Let me ask again, as your customer: What specifically can I count on you for?  What is your promise to me? What is is that you guarantee me?  


By the way it is not enough for you to make me a promise.  For this promise to be credible it has to be public. Yet even a public written promise is not enough.

A written public promise to me, your customer, is merely the starting point for showing me that you are serious about treating me fairly as your customer.

What else do I expect from you? I expect you to:

  • tell me clearly and precisely what it is that you expect from me – in order for your promise to apply to me; and
  • set out what exactly I can count on you to do, by when, as and when you fail to keep your promise.

By the way I am taking it for granted that you will figure out when you have failed to keep your promise. And that where I am the only one that knows that you failed to keep your promise, you will make it easy/quick for me to bring this to your attention.

Finally, I’d have a lot more confidence in your promise if you were to share up-to-date information on how you (as an organisation) are doing in keeping your promise to your customers  – this information needs to come from a credible independent body.

Erich Fromm On The Central Challenge Of Cultivating Meaningful Relationships With Customers

What Is The Central Challenge Of Building Meaningful & Profitable Relationships With Customers? Is this challenge about opening up 24/7 access to your business through any and all channels?  Is it about coming up with new products and services that attract customers like bright lights attract moths at night-time?  Is it about taking out costly, unpredictable, unreliable human beings and replacing them with technology?  Is it about collecting and mining all the data you can get your hands on to generate insight to customers and entice them with the right offer, at the right time, through the right communication channel?  Is it about redesigning processes and gluing up all the interaction channels so that the customer experience across the customer journey is an effortless one?

Perhaps. Or maybe this is simply thinking inside the existing way of showing up and travelling in the world.  What way am I referring to? The technological way. What kind of way is that?  It is the way that refers to human beings as human resources. It is the way that refers to customers as assets. It is the way that thinks that listening to the voice of the customer is the same as reading statistics and text which summarises and details the survey responses coming in from some customers. It is the way that seeks to replace human beings and human to human conversations with automated interfaces and self-service…..

I invite you to listen to the speaking of Erich Fromm written in the 1940s (bolding mine):

The insignificance of the individual in our era concerns not only his role as a business man, employee, or manual labourer, but also his role as a customer. A drastic change has occurred in the role of the customer in the last decades. The customer who went into a retail store owned by an independent business man was sure to get personal attention: his individual purchase was important to the owner of the store; he was received like somebody who mattered, his wishes were studied; the very act of buying gave him a feeling of importance and dignity.

How different is the relationship of the customer to a department store. He is impressed by the vastness of the building, the number of employees, the profusion of commodities displayed; all that makes him feel small and unimportant by comparison. As an individual he is of no importance to the department store. He is important as “a customer”; the store does not want to lose him, because this would indicate that there is something wrong and it might mean that the store would lose other customers. As an abstract customer he is important; as a concrete customer he is utterly unimportant. There is nobody who is glad about his coming, nobody who is particularly concerned about his wishes. 

– Erich Fromm, The Fear Of Freedom

It occurs to me that many (if not most) organisations struggle to cultivate meaningful-profitable relationships with customers despite spending significant sums on the likes of customer analytics, CRM, marketing automation, and VoC. Why?  My experience of the last 15 years working in the Customer space is that action has been at the abstract level of customer and customers. And almost nobody has paid attention to the experience of the concrete flesh and blood customer as a human being.  As such technology has been used to remove rather than enhance what little was left of the human to human relating.  Technology can do many useful things including increasing access and reducing effort. What it cannot do well is this: create, enliven, enrich human relating.